Griesshammer

Harald W. Grießhammer

Associate Professor for Theoretical Nuclear Physics
CCAS Dean's Reserach Chair
Graduate Advisor, Department of Physics
Institue for Nuclear Studies
Department of Physics
The George Washington University
Washington DC 20052, USA
Office Hours: Posted in syllabi -- and when I am in my office.
Office: 725 21st St NW, Corcoran Hall 306
Phone: +1/202/994-3849
Internet: hgrie<at>gwu.edu           Skype: hgrie.gwu
My laboratory is the fountain pen.


Contents

Research Topics
Publications
Lectures and Teaching
Useless Links



Fancy picture, eh?
It's from an article
in the GW Newspaper

ByGeorge about my work
(well, sort of...).
Griesshammer with whiteboard nuclear chart


Research Topics

Click to get the solution of QCD.
An Always-Up-To-Date List of Publications from SPIRES.

Series of 3 lectures on Effective Field Theories in Few-Nucleon Systems, National Nuclear Physics Summer School June 2008 (.djvu format, manuscript).

      Non-perturbative Physics of QCD (ancient)


Lectures and Teaching

The  material in this Section is originally based upon work supported by the US National Science Foundation under CAREER award PHY-0645598. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are entirely mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Graduate Curriculum

In 2008, GW Physics introduced a "Two-By-Four" Graduate Curriculum and Qualifying Examination Format, with the goal to escape 60-year-old habits in US Graduate education. The new curriculum:
A presentation with more details and the new course sequence is available as .pdf file here.

Courses and Manu-Scripts

Lecture Manu-Scripts: 
This material is based upon work supported by the US National Science Foundation under CAREER award PHY-0645598. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are entirely mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Chapter-by-chapter manuscripts are available in .djvu format (http://djvu.sourceforge.net/). Follow the links of chapter headings below, or at the course websites.

Caveat: Warning and Disclaimer

These are my notes for preparing the class, in my handwriting. While considerable effort has been invested to ensure the accuracy of the Physics presented, this script bears only witness of my limited understanding of the subject. I am most grateful to every reader who can point out typos, errors, omissions or misconceptions. Maybe over the years, with lots of student participation, this can grow into something remotely useful.
The script only intends to ease the pain of following the lecture, and does not replace the thorough study of textbooks.
The script is not intended to be comprehensible, comprehensive -- or even useful.
It is certainly not legible. Your mileage will vary. This script is not useful or relevant for exams of any kind.

Best Practice
Read over the manuscript before class. Try to grasp the essential points. The better prepared you are, the more we can focus on discussing your questions and observations, and solve problems. The class becomes more interactive and thus more fun -- and therefore you learn more. Study details of the manuscript after the lecture, and follow the derivation of all formulae line-by-line. This is excellent and free exercise for your math skills, and makes sure you not just "read along". It is also the starting point for your own literature research using good books like those recommended for particular subjects in the "Suggested Reading" columns at the course websites.

Mathematical Methods of Theoretical Physics (PHYS 6110, 4 credits)
with Computational Physics I (PHYS 6130, 1 credit)

Contents
(with links to manu-script -- see Caveat/Warning/Disclaimer) The course website also contains links to
  • syllabus and blow-by-blow schedule with bibliography and additional information;
  • a question sheet to check your progress;
  • HW problems (solutions available to teachers upon email request).
Electro-Dynamics and Classical Field Theory (PHYS 6210, 4 credits)
with Computational Physics II (PHYS 6230, 1 credit)

Contents
(with links to manu-script -- see Caveat/Warning/Disclaimer)


The course website also contains links to
  • syllabus and blow-by-blow schedule with bibliography and additional information;
  • a question sheet to check your progress;
  • HW problems (solutions available to teachers upon email request).

Graduate Nuclear and Particle Physics I (homepage here)
(PHYS 6610, 3 credits; all new sequence in new curriculum)
Graduate Nuclear and Particle Physics II (homepage here)
(PHYS 6710, 3 credits; all new sequence in new curriculum)

Click on each picture for movies I created on spontaneous symmetry breaking of a global continuous symmetry (Nambu-Goldstone theorem/mode)
SSB in mechanicsSSB in QM
Other lectures

And that was the official part...

Now for Something Completely Different: --- Favourite Weird Links
hgrie, 8th March 2019