PUBLICATIONS and PRESENTATIONS


ACADEMIC JOURNALS (PEER-REVIEWED)


Under Preparation

42. “Project Management Performance in Capital Projects” Target Journal: IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management.

 

41. “The Dynamic Capabilities of International Contractors to Meet Changing Project Environments” Target Journal: IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management.

 

40. “Evolution of Project Based Organization (PBO): A Case Study” International Journal of Project Management.

 

Submitted for Review, Re-Reviewed, or Under Revision

39. Kwak, Y.H. Liu, M., Patanakul, P., and Zwikael, O. (2014). “Government Projects: Challenges and Opportunities” IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management. Under review, August

 

38. Ahn, Y.H., Kwak, Y.H., and Suk, S.J. (2014) “Organizational Transformation Strategies for Adopting Building Information” Journal of Management in Engineering, invitation to revise and resubmit, August.

 

Accepted or Published

37. Li, Y., Lu, Y., Kwak, Y.H., and Dong, S. (2014) “Developing A City-Level Multi-project Management Information System for Chinese Urbanization”, International Journal of Project Management, doi: 10.1016/j.ijproman.2014.06.011

 

ABSTRACT: The unprecedented Chinese urbanization leads to massive government-funded construction projects. In most cities, a special project management mode called Agent Construction Model (ACM) has been adopted to manage and govern these projects under the same umbrella of administrative standards. The ACM integrates all available government resources to complete the urbanization projects but meanwhile it faces great challenges from overwhelming complex information and information processing. This study presents the development of a city-level multi-project management information system to decompose the information processing complexity in the context of ACM management mode. The complex adaptive system and two specific development techniquesadaptive project framework and modularized functional design methodare introduced for the system development. The system was validated at a typical urbanization city in Changchun, China. This research complements the existing project information system by adopting complexity design principles and it also provides practical value for managing large-scale urbanization projects.

 

36. Ghosh, S., Buckler, L., Skibniewski, M., Negahban, S., and Kwak, Y.H. (2014) “Organizational readiness to undertake sustainability projects: A Case Study”. Technological and Economic Development of Economy, doi: 10.3846/20294913.2014.850755

 

ABSTRACT: Sustainable development represents a major challenge of the 21st century. Organizations use projects to implement strategic corporate objectives, exploring sustainable development from a project management perspective is imperative. While current project management techniques are well defined in terms of content and process to manage the budget-scope-time constraint, availability of organization resources and ability to adopt project governance strategies in a changing business environment, like incorporating sustainability in business process is ambiguous, literature has not explored how to cope with a normative situation like sustainability. We consider Small-to-Mid-Size-Construction-Organizations (SMSCOs), which makes up the largest portion of the project-based industry and are most impacted by new government regulations, as our population of interest. This paper addresses two primary objectives in relation to organizational resources available for SMSCOs: to identify an organization’s shortcomings in undertaking a sustainable project, and to identify means for improving organizational readiness to  cope with governance of sustainable projects. A case study with a SMSCO to understand activities, resource availability, and how to improve organization readiness to undertake projects related to sustainability is discussed. A conceptual framework is presented for the adoptive project governance process to ensure resource constrained organizations like SMSCO’s can align better to govern such projects.

 

35. Choi, S., Kim, D.Y., Han, S.H., and Kwak, Y.H. (2014) “Conceptual Cost Prediction Model for Public Road Planning via Rough Set Theory and Case-Based Reasoning”, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 140(1), 04013026. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)CO.1943-7862.0000743.

 

ABSTRACT: Long-term transportation policies require government officials to predict the cost of public road construction during the conceptual planning phase. However, early cost prediction is often inaccurate because public officials are not familiar with cost engineering practices, and moreover, have limited time and insufficient information for estimating the possible range of the cost distribution. This study develops a conceptual cost prediction model by combining rough set theory, case-based reasoning, and genetic algorithms to better predict costs in the conceptual planning phase. Rough set theory and qualitative in-depth interviews are integrated to select the proper input attributes for the cost prediction model. Case-based reasoning is then applied to predict road construction costs by considering users’ difficulties in the conceptual policy planning phase. A genetic algorithm is also used to assist the rough set model and case-based reasoning model to obtain optimal solutions. The result of the analysis shows that the proposed conceptual cost prediction model is reliable and robust compared to the existing cost prediction model.

 

34. Kwak, Y.H., Walewski, J., Sleeper, D., and Sadatsafavi, H. (2014) “What Can We Learn from The Hoover Dam: that Influenced Modern Project Management?International Journal of Project Management, 32(2), 256-264. doi:10.1016/j.ijproman.2013.04.002.

 

ABSTRACT: The Hoover Dam was completed two years ahead of schedule and under budget despite political, economical, technical, and organizational obstacles. Previous literature regarding the Hoover Dam project focused primarily on the aspects of design, engineering, and construction, with minimal analysis or discussions on project and program management techniques unique to this undertaking. This paper examines project and program management practices applied to the building of the Hoover Dam, and discusses how these factors contributed to the establishment and evolution of modern project management principles, tools, and techniques. A historical review of the Hoover Dam project reveals that the project team implemented a number of innovative strategies and practices that are comparable to critical success factors for today’s megaprojects to overcome monumental project challenges and obstacles. This paper conveys the organizational and managerial best practices and presents lessons learned associated with the planning and construction of the Hoover Dam project.

 

33. Choi, K. Haque, M., Lee, H.W., Cho, Y. and Kwak, Y.H. (2013) “Macroeconomic Labor Productivity and Its Impact on Firm’s ProfitabilityJournal of The Operational Research Society, 64, 1258–1268. doi:10.1057/jors.2012.157

 

ABSTRACT: The construction industry is one of the largest sectors in the US economy, yet little is known about the key macroeconomic parameters that affect its industry’s structure and performance. The main objectives of this research are (1) to analyse the macroeconomic performance of construction industry as a whole and at 14 of its sub-sectors in terms of labour productivity, gross margin, and worker's wages; and (2) to develop a quantitative model that predicts a firm's profitability by analysing various levels of labour productivity. The results of a non-linear regression analysis based on the comprehensive US Economic Census data show that the construction industry’s sub-sectors with the highest productivity are the most profitable with regard to the gross margins that they are able to generate. This study and its model will help decision makers better assess macroeconomic performance and conduct trend analysis of the construction industry to serve as a basis for developing strategic roadmap for the future.

 

32. Lee, G. and Kwak, Y.H. (2012) “Open Government Implementation Model: A Stage Model for Achieving Increased Public Engagement” Government Information Quarterly, 29(4), 492-503. doi:10.1016/j.giq.2012.06.001

 

ABSTRACT: Social media has opened up unprecedented new possibilities of engaging the public in government work. In response to the Open Government Directive U.S. federal agencies developed their open government plan and launched numerous social media-based public engagement initiatives. However, we find that many of these initiatives do not deliver the intended outcomes due to various organizational, technological, and financial challenges. We propose an Open Government Maturity Model based on our field studies with U.S. federal healthcare administration agencies. This model is specifically developed to assess and guide open government initiatives which focus on transparent, interactive, participatory, collaborative public engagement that are largely enabled by emerging technologies such as social media. The model consists of five maturity levels: initial conditions (Level 1), data transparency (Level 2), open participation (Level 3), open collaboration (Level 4), and ubiquitous engagement (Level 5). We argue that there is a logical sequence for increasing social media-based public engagement and agencies should focus on achieving one maturity level at a time. The Open Government Maturity Model helps government agencies implement their open government initiatives effectively by building organizational and technological capabilities in an orderly manner. We discuss challenges and best practices for each maturity level and conclude by presenting recommendations.

 

31. Kwak, Y.H., Park, J, Chung, B., Ghosh, S. (2012) “Understanding End Users’ Acceptance of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System in Project-Based Sectors” IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management, 59(2), 266-277. doi:10.1109/TEM.2011.2111456

 

ABSTRACT: This study aims at providing an alternative view of users’ Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) acceptance. Despite the large body of literature, there are still empirical inquiries to investigate the ERP system implementation from end-users’ perspectives as well as from different organizational contexts. To address these issues, we set a project-based sector as our population of interest and seek to understand how project management practices are interrelated with end-users’ cognitive perception, and in the end, with their behavioral intention of using the ERP system. In doing so, this study incorporates the best practices of ERP system implementation projects, internal support, external (consultant) support, and functionality selection, into the extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) that includes belief constructs and socio-environmental construct (subjective norm).  The empirical analyses show that managerial practices and socio-environmental factor are significantly related to the original TAM variables in the context of ERP system. One of the interesting findings is the negative effect of consultant support on perceived usefulness, but positive effect on the perceived ease of use, suggesting a useful reference for future research. This study extends existing literature by investigating potential managerial and socio-environmental factors affecting user adoption behavior in a different organizational context. This study would also benefit project-based sectors by offering valuable managerial insights which enable them to appreciate and improve end-users’ ERP system acceptance and utilization.

 

30. Choi, K. Kwak, Y.H. Pyeon, J., and Son, K. (2012) “Schedule Effectiveness of Alternative Contracting Strategies for Transportation Infrastructure Improvement Projects” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 138(3), 323-330. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)CO.1943-7862.0000431.

 

ABSTRACT: Incentive/Disincentive (I/D) and Cost-plus-Time (A+B) are the two most widely used alternative contracting strategies to implement public transportation infrastructure projects in the United States. However, little is known about their impact on project schedule performance.  As a result, state highway agencies often struggle to select effective contracting strategies and estimate the budgets accurately for transportation projects.  A quantitative analysis drawing on 1,372 public transportation projects in California was conducted to address this shortcoming by determining the schedule effectiveness of alternative contracting strategies. The analysis showed that I/D contracting strategy was effective in shortening overall construction duration, however, A+B contracting strategy led to severe schedule delays, worse than conventionally contracted projects. The findings of this study will assist decision-makers, particularly state highway agencies, make better informed decisions when they are planning and selecting the most effective alternative contracting strategies for transportation improvement projects.

 

29. Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (2012) “History, Practices, and Future of Earned Value Management (EVM) in Government: Perspectives from NASA” Project Management Journal, 43(1), 77-90. doi:10.1002/pmj.20272.

 

ABSTRACT: The goal of this research is to explore the history, practices, and future of the Earned Value Management (EVM) method in government, and seek opportunities and suggestions for wider implementation of EVM for managing, measuring, and controlling project performance and progress. First, this study reviews historical background and evolution of EVM implementation in government. Then, current practices for implementing EVM are discussed through examination of EVM adoption and implementation at NASA. The research shows that NASA receives substantial project management value from its implementation of EVM, promotes consistent practices across the agency, and provides effective training on leadership, scheduling, EVM, and data analysis. This study also provides recommendations to improve and broaden the applications of current EVM and project management practices to other government programs and projects. Findings of this research contribute to the management of performance of future projects and programs and encourage the project management community to review, rethink, and advance the application of EVM.

 

28. Choi, K. and Kwak, Y.H. (2012) “Decision Support Model for Incentives/Disincentives Time-Cost Tradeoff”, Automation in Construction, 21(1), 219-228. doi:10.1016/j.autcon.2011.06.006.

 

ABSTRACT: Offering contractors a monetary incentive for early project completion provides agencies with an innovative means to expedite construction. To be effective, the incentive amount should exceed the Contractor’s Additional Cost (CAC) for completing the project early. Yet, estimating CAC poses a major challenge to agencies because of contractors’ reluctance to disclose information about their profits. This study introduces a predictive, quantitative model that estimates realistic CACs by combining an existing schedule simulation technique with a regression method. An innovative, reliable tool called Construction Analysis for Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies (CA4PRS) was used for the simulation. Using CA4PRS, a set of contractors’ time-cost tradeoff data was created and a linear regression analysis was performed to predict CAC growth rate by analyzing how the CAC interacts with the agency’s specified schedule goal. The robustness of the proposed model was also validated through two case studies. This model can assist decision-makers in estimating better optimal incentive amounts.

 

27. Li, Y., Lu, Y., Kwak, Y.H., Le, Y., and He, Q. (2011) “Social Network Analysis and Organizational Control in Complex Projects: A Construction Case of EXPO 2010 China”, Engineering Project Organization Journal, 1(4), 223-237. doi: 10.1080/21573727.2011.601453.

 

ABSTRACT: Social network analysis (SNA) has been widely used to explore the existence and strength of connections among various actors within an organization. Recently, understanding and interpreting social aspects in project organization have gained great interests in project management research. Consequently, there is a need to analyse complex project organization (CPO) by using SNA with increasing numbers of large-scale and complex projects. The goal of this research is to better appreciate the social network relations in a CPO environment and to improve the organizational efficiency and team performance through new organizational control mechanisms (OCMs). This study first discusses a multi-level social network framework with a focus on the CPO where major analytical components of the framework are presented including modeling elements and structures and preferred parameters. Next, social network-oriented OCM and strategies are illustrated and compared with regular organizational controls. To examine the mentioned SNA framework and strategy, this study employs a construction case of EXPO 2010 Shanghai China and analyses the information transmission, role and positional analysis, clique analysis, management power and leadership of the network. The result of the case study provides insightful suggestions for controlling the complex organization, including enhancement of organizational learning ability, standardized working protocols and regulations, and reinforces the management of key information intermediaries, professional requirement for centrality position units and the power shift in some ‘special units’. The case also reveals that the informal relations have more significant impacts on the organizational power, leadership and control, especially for complex projects.

 

26. Ryoo, B.Y., Skibniewski, M.J., and Kwak, Y.H. (2010) “Web-based Construction Project Specification System”, Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering, 24(2), 212-221. doi: 10.1061/(ASCE)0887-3801(2010)24:2(212)

 

ABSTRACT: Due to discrepancies and multiple ownerships in construction specifications in Korea, writing a project specification is very challenging. This paper presents a framework and architecture of an integrated construction specification system, SPEC WRITER, which is a web-based system that enables specification writers to access its remote databases through the Internet. The system is equipped with the database of 15 standard specifications, 13 specialty specifications, national design guidelines, technical standards, standard drawings, over 45,000 construction materials, and more than 600 manufacturers.  In addition, it is connected to the databases of national construction laws, regulations, and decrees through the Internet. A framework and architecture as well as information breakdown structure for specifications and construction materials are provided in detail and presents a way to maintain and operate the databases as an e-Business model. SPEC WRITER enables specification owners to synchronize construction specifications with associated material and national standards.

 

25. Kwak, Y.H. and Smith, B. (2009) “Managing Risks in Mega Defense Acquisition Projects: Performance, Policy, and Opportunities” International Journal of Project Management, 27(8), 812-820. doi:10.1016/j.ijproman.2009.02.002

 

ABSTRACT: This research explores key aspects involved in the process of managing risk associated with projects within the US Department of Defense (DOD). First, various US Government Accountability Office reports are analyzed to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the DOD’s overall program management practices, as well as individual projects. Then, the evolution and progress of United States Army’s Future Combat Systems project is examined in detail as a case study to substantiate the argument that insufficient risk management has contributed to project delays and cost overruns significantly. Poor risk management practices and performance are not unique to the Army, but arises from a system bred into the process of gaining approval to implement projects in the DOD. Incorporating an executable risk management plan in the planning phase and filling key positions with personnel trained to recognize sound proposals from contractors would make significant strides toward improving overall project management practices in the DOD.

 

24. Kwak, Y.H. and Ingall, L. (2009) “Exploring Monte Carlo Simulations Applications for Project ManagementIEEE Engineering Management Review, 37(2), 83-91. doi: 10.1109/EMR.2009.5235458. Reprint from Risk Management: An International Journal, 9(1), 44-57.

 

ABSTRACT: Monte Carlo simulation is a useful technique for modeling and analyzing real-world systems and situations. This paper is a conceptual paper that explores the applications of Monte Carlo simulation for managing project risks and uncertainties. The benefits of Monte Carlo simulation are using quantified data, allowing project managers to better justify and communicate their arguments when senior management is pushing for unrealistic project expectations. Proper risk management education, training, and advancements in computing technology combined with Monte Carlo simulation software allow project managers to implement the method easily. In the field of project management, Monte Carlo simulation can quantify the effects of risk and uncertainty in project schedules and budgets, giving the project manager a statistical indicator of project performance such as target project completion date and budget.

 

23. Chung, B., Syachrani, S., Jeong, H.S., and Kwak, Y.H. (2009) “Applying Process Simulation Technique to Value Engineering Model: A Case Study of Hospital Building Project” IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management, 56(3), 549-559. doi:10.1109/TEM.2009.2013831

 

ABSTRACT: Applying Value Engineering (VE) in a construction project has proven to be an effective way to save the cost of a project. Different VE models have been developed and used in construction projects in the past. One common attribute of construction projects is the dependence of a highly qualitative decision-making process: capturing, interpreting, and quantifying expert’s subjective judgment. This study proposes an advanced five-phase VE model, each phase of which consists of series of steps to better quantify subjective opinions of VE team members. Construction simulation technique (CYCLONE) is used as a means to minimize the subjectivity in estimating the value of different alternatives in terms of time and cost savings. A case study shows that the advanced five-phase VE model improves analysis, assessment, and decision on value engineering. This new approach has a great potential to minimize subjectivity during VE process and improves VE decision making process by using quantitatively derived data from the simulation analysis.

 

22. Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (2009) “Analyzing Project Management Research: Perspectives from Top Management Journals” International Journal of Project Management, 27(5), 435-446. doi:10.1016/j.ijproman.2008.08.004 Selected as Science Direct Top 25 Hottest Articles in International Journal of Project Management.

 

ABSTRACT: This paper examines project management research from the perspective of its relationship to allied disciplines in the management field and provides a view of the progress of project management as a research-based academic discipline.  This study which is partially funded by the Project Management Institute specifically investigates project management research in allied disciplines from 18 top management and business journal publications and categorizes it into eight allied disciplines.  The evolution and trends of project management research are analyzed by exploring, identifying, and classifying management journal articles on project management in the allied disciplines.  The analysis of project management research in the allied disciplines reveals an explosion of popularity and strong interest in project management research.  The ranking of occurrences of the eight allied disciplines from most to the least appeared subjects over the last 50 years are 1) Strategy/Portfolio Management; 2) Operations Research/Decision Sciences; 3) Organizational Behavior/Human Resources Management; 4) Information Technology/Information Systems; 5) Technology Applications/Innovation; 6) Performance Management/Earned Value Management; 7) Engineering and Construction; and 8) Quality Management/Six Sigma.  Result of this study help us better understand the evolution of project management as a field of practice and an academic discipline, and allow us to provide suggestions for future project management research opportunities.

 

21. Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (2009) “Availability Impact Analysis of Project Management Trends: Perspectives from Allied Disciplines” Project Management Journal, 40(2), 94-103. doi:10.1002/pmj.20111

 

ABSTRACT: The goal of this research was to analyze current and future trends of the allied management disciplines that influence project management.  We have collected academicians’ and practitioners’ perceptions on the trends, impact, and challenges relevant to project management.  We specifically asked about the availability of knowledge (articles, literature, and experts) and the potential impact of allied disciplines related to project management.  We were able to assess where the allied disciplines currently stand in terms of availability and impact as well as make predictions about the future.  The thoughts and visions collected from this research provide valuable insights for identifying trends in the allied disciplines and their impact on the future of project management, as well as the opportunities, challenges, and obstacles.  We believe that the project management community should be actively engaged in acquiring knowledge and participating in major activities of the allied disciplines to better understand the emerging and promising practices for the future.

 

20. Han, S.H., Yun, S.M., Kim, H., Kwak, Y.H., Park, H.K., and Lee, S.H. (2009) “Analyzing Schedule Delay of Mega Project: Lessons Learned from Korea Train Express (KTX)” IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management, 56(2). pp. 243-256. doi:10.1109/TEM.2009.2016042

 

ABSTRACT: In 2004, Korea became the fifth country in the world to own and operate a high speed railway. There were numerous challenges in planning and managing the high speed railway project that resulted in schedule delays and cost overruns. The delay causes of each activity along the 412 km Korea high speed railway route were difficult to examine because the project consisted of 11,141 activities. First, critical sections in the railway route that influenced significant delays to project completion were selected. Then, delay-cause analyses of those critical sections were conducted in detail. Based on the analysis, five major delay causes for Korea high speed railway were identified. They are: Lack of owner’s abilities and strategies to manage hi-tech oriented mega project; frequent changes of routes triggered by conflicts between public agencies and growing public resistance from environmental concerns; the inappropriate project delivery system; a lack of proper scheduling tool tailored for a linear mega project; and redesign and change orders of main structures and tunnels for high speed railway which is fundamentally different from the traditional railway construction. This paper provides lessons learned for engineers to better prepare and respond to potential causes of schedule delays for mega projects.

 

19. Kwak, Y.H., Chih, Y., and Ibbs, C.W. (2009) “Towards a Comprehensive Understanding of Public Private Partnerships (PPP) for Infrastructure DevelopmentCalifornia Management Review, 51(2), pp.51-78.

 

ABSTRACT: Public Private Partnerships (PPP) have emerged as one of the major approaches for delivering infrastructure projects effectively.  As a result, understanding and enhancing knowledge of PPP continue to be a matter of significance and importance.  During the past decades, practitioners and researchers studied wide range of topics of PPP.  The purpose of this paper is to collect, codify, and consolidate previous studies and conceptualize a PPP framework for infrastructure development.  This paper discusses definitions, types, examples of worldwide applications, as well as benefits and obstacles of PPP by conducting extensive literature review on PPP-related research over the last 20 years.  The syntheses of the knowledge present rational and practical foundations from which the laws, regulations, and guidelines for effective and successful PPP implementation can be established.  The analyses of literatures reveal that PPP can create new and long-term business opportunities with a chance to deliver infrastructure services of higher quality and efficiency.  However, these benefits will only be materialized when a PPP project is properly planned and managed and both the public and private sectors work together successfully.

 

18. Chung, B., Skibniewski, M.J., and Kwak, Y.H. (2009) “Developing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems Success Model for Construction Industry” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 135(3). pp. 207-216. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2009)135:3(207)

 

ABSTRACT: Recently, a significant proportion of major construction companies embarked on the implementation of integrated Information Technology (IT) solutions such as Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems to better integrate various business functions. However, these integrated systems in construction sector present a set of unique challenges, different from those in the manufacturing or other service sector. There have been many cases of failure in implementing ERP systems, so it is critical to identify and understand the factors that largely determine the success or failure of ERP implementation in construction industry. This paper presents the process of developing ERP systems success model to guide successful ERP implementation and to identify success factors for ERP systems implementation. The paper identifies factors affecting the success and failure of ERP systems, and designs a success model to analyze the relationships between key factors and the success of such systems. The proposed ERP systems success model adapts Technology Acceptance Model and DeLone & McLean’s IS Success Model and integrates those with key project management principles. The goal of ERP systems success model is to better evaluate, plan, and implement ERP projects and help senior managers make better decisions when considering ERP systems in their organization.

 

17. Chung, B., Skibniewski, M.J., Lucas, Jr., H.C., and Kwak, Y.H. (2008) “Analyzing Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems Implementation Success Factors in the Engineering-Construction Industry” Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering, 22(6). pp. 373-382. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0887-3801(2008)22:6(373)

 

ABSTRACT: Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems offer many benefits to the engineering-construction industry.  Many construction firms recognize the benefits of ERP systems implementation; however, they still hesitate to adopt these systems due to high cost, uncertainties, and risks.  This study identifies and analyzes critical factors that need to be considered to ensure successful ERP systems implementation in construction industry.  First, this paper identifies the factors associated with the success and failure of ERP systems, and provides indicators to evaluate the success of such systems.  Then, the paper develops an Information System Success Model to analyze the relationships between factors and success indicators.  Finally, the paper provides recommendations for successful ERP systems based on the analysis.  The derived success factors should help senior managers in construction firms make better decisions and improve their business value by implementing most effective EPR systems.

 

16. Kwak, Y.H. and Dixon C.K. (2008) “Risk Management Framework for Pharmaceutical Research and Development Projects” International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 1(4). pp. 552-565. doi:10.1108/17538370810906255

 

ABSTRACT: Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify best practices from high-technology industries that face many of the same challenges around uncertainty, complexity, and risk that are faced by the pharmaceutical industry. Design/methodology/approach: This research has conducted an extensive review of risk management literature and research conducted in high technology industries to collect some of the key best practices for high-risk research projects. Findings: A literature review of recent risk management publications from three high-technology industries yielded thirteen best practices in project risk management that could potentially be applied to pharmaceutical R&D projects to improve managing risks and uncertainties of managing projects. By reviewing these lessons learned from industries that share many of the challenges of the pharmaceutical R&D projects, it is suggested that the implementation of risk management in the context of drug development projects will require adaptation to the specific needs and challenges. Research limitations/implications: Implementing a risk management process is very challenging for pharmaceutical R&D projects, as there are high degrees of complexity, uncertainty, and large amounts of resources at stake. Many of the techniques could be applied to all stages of drug development, but some are clearly most applicable to particular stages. Some will work for small, medium and large pharmaceuticals, though the way they are implemented should be modified to meet the needs and resources of the particular company. Practical implications: This study will serve as a basis for exploration and discussion that will result in controlled application and experimentation with these approaches, and this in turn could lead to real improvements in the use of risk management in pharmaceutical companies. Originality/value: An exploration of the methods they have employed to address risk in R&D projects, as well as the outcomes of the application of those methods, should reveal tools, techniques, processes, training, and approaches that can be effectively applied to pharmaceutical development projects, and support the value of spending resources to employ risk management practices. Key Words: Project Management, Risk Management, Pharmaceutical Industry, Research and Development. Project Article Type: Conceptual Paper

 

15. Kwak, Y.H., Watson, R.J., and Anbari, F.T. (2008) "Comprehensive Framework for Estimating the Deployment Cost of Integrated Business Transformation Projects" International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, 1(1). pp. 131-139. doi:10.1108/17538370810846469

 

ABSTRACT: Purpose: This paper is a summary of a successfully defended doctoral dissertation (Watson, 2007).  The purpose of this paper is to place this research in context to emerging areas of project management and Service Science, Management and Engineering (SSME) and to encourage others to embark on further research related to this important topic. Paper Type: A doctoral dissertation review as a research note. Approach: Results reported in this paper were based upon action learning from research in which a project management tool for estimating deployment cost was developed by capturing the knowledge of Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) and subsequently tested against projects from various geographic areas. Findings: There were two primary findings.  A development and analysis of the conceptual estimating framework supports the assertion that the use of the framework provides an awareness of the project that may not otherwise be observed or, at best, would be observed later in the life of the project and potentially addressed at a higher cost.  A strong association has been found between the conceptual estimate produced by the comprehensive framework and the conceptual estimate produced manually through the use of subject matter experts. Implications: Research efforts on processes and methodologies for conceptual estimating of human resource hours (cost) are mainly focused on software application development but not fully studied and applied to the subsequent deployment and adoption of the technology.  One factor that contributes to this situation is the intensive use of SMEs required for estimating. By limiting the amount of recurring time requests of SMEs, it is proposed that more organizations would utilize a conceptual estimating framework and receive its associated benefits. Value of the paper: From academic perspective, the synthesis of the technology management, business processes, and the conceptual estimating framework enhances the body of knowledge of project management. For practical applications, the method and framework employed can be utilized to build functioning conceptual estimating tools for deployment, which may lead to expense savings during the estimating process and, as this study surmises, will lead to more effective project management, control, and implementation.

 

14. Kwak, Y.H. and Ingall, L. (2007) “Exploring Monte Carlo Simulation Applications for Project ManagementRisk Management: An International Journal, 9(1), pp. 44-57. doi:10.1057/palgrave.rm.8250017

 

ABSTRACT: Monte Carlo simulation is a useful technique for modeling and analyzing real-world systems and situations. This paper is a conceptual paper that explores the applications of Monte Carlo simulation for managing project risks and uncertainties. The benefits of Monte Carlo simulation are using quantified data, allowing project managers to better justify and communicate their arguments when senior management is pushing for unrealistic project expectations. Proper risk management education, training and advancements in computing technology and Monte Carlo simulation software allow project managers to implement the method easily. In the field of project management, Monte Carlo simulation can quantify the effects of risk and uncertainty in project schedules and budgets, giving the project manager a statistical indicator of project performance such as target project completion date and budget.

 

13. Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (2006) “Benefits, Obstacles, and Future of Six Sigma Approach” Technovation: The International Journal of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Technology Management, 26(5-6), pp. 708-715. doi:10.1016/j.technovation.2004.10.003

 

ABSTRACT: Understanding the key features, obstacles, and shortcomings of the six sigma method allows organizations to better support their strategic directions, and increasing needs for coaching, mentoring, and training. It also provides opportunities to better implement six sigma projects. This paper examines the evolution, benefits, and challenges of six sigma practices and identifies the key factors influencing successful six sigma project implementations. It integrates the lessons learned from successful six sigma projects and considers further improvements to the six sigma approach. Effective six sigma principles and practices will succeed by refining the organizational culture continuously. Cultural changes require time and commitment before they are strongly implanted into the organization.

 

12. Kwak, Y.H. and Watson, R. (2005) “Conceptual Estimating Tool for Technology-Driven Projects: Exploring Parametric Estimating Technique” Technovation: The International Journal of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Technology Management, 25(12), pp.1430-1436. doi:10.1016/j.technovation.2004.10.007

 

ABSTRACT: This paper examines parametric estimating technique applied to technology-driven projects. Parametric cost estimating is a widely used approach for bidding on a contract, input into a cost benefit analysis, or as the pre-planning tool for project implementation. Extensive literature reviews suggest that effective parametric estimating methodology is becoming an essential tool for technology-driven organizations. The use of parametric estimating in budgeting, scheduling, and control of projects will enhance the ability of project management organizations to effectively and efficiently utilize valuable resources. The benefit of parametric estimating is to use as an estimating model for better determining potential resource requirements during the project pre-planning and conceptual phase.

 

11. Watson, R. and Kwak, Y.H. (2005) “Development of a Parametric Estimating Model for Technology-Driven Deployment Project” ICFAI Journal of Operations Management, August, 2005. Reprint of Watson, R. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) “Development of a Parametric Estimating Model for Technology-Driven Deployment Project” 2004 Winter Simulation Conference, Washington, DC, December 5-8, 2004.

 

10. Kwak. Y.H. and LaPlace, K (2005) "Examining Risk Tolerance in Project-driven Organization" Technovation: The International Journal of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Technology Management, 25(6), pp.691-695. doi:10.1016/j.technovation.2003.09.003

 

ABSTRACT: Risk tolerance is often misunderstood or overlooked by project managers. The levels and perspectives of risk tolerance are dynamic throughout the project lifecycle. Risk tolerance has three different perspectives when you are involved in a project. The firm’s risk tolerance varies according to the firm’s financial stability and project diversification. A project manager’s risk tolerance is affected by job security and corporate culture. The stakeholder’s risk tolerance is influenced by project objective. Unfortunately, failures in communication between the stakeholder and project manager are quite common because there are few applicable tools available to support the process. The project success will depend on agreeable level of risk tolerance and support of compensation policies, corporate culture, performance reviews, and early risk management planning.

 

9. Kwak, Y.H. and Stoddard, J. (2004) "Project Risk Management: Lessons Learned from Software Development Environment" Technovation: The International Journal of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Technology Management, 24(11), pp.915-920. doi:10.1016/S0166-4972(03)00033-6

 

ABSTRACT: The challenges and realities in applying effective software risk management processes are difficult, especially, integrating the risk management processes into software development organizations. However, the benefits of implementing effective risk management tools and techniques in software development project are equally great. Current perceptions and emerging trends of various software risk management practices are reviewed and risks specific to software development projects are identified. Implementing effective risk management process will succeed by changing the organizational culture. This paper addresses lessons learned from implementing project risk management practices in software development environment.

 

8. Ibbs, C.W., Kwak, Y.H., Ng, T., and Odabasi (2003) "Project Delivery Systems and Project Change: Quantitative Analysis" Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 129(4), pp. 382-387. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2003)129:4(382)

 

ABSTRACT: Design/build has become one of the favorable project delivery methods in the engineering construction industry. Numerous studies advocated the use of design/build over traditional design/bid/build delivery approach. A comprehensive analysis of sixty-seven global projects from Construction Industry Institute's database shows that design/build projects may not provide all the benefits to project performance. The study found time saving was a definitive advantage of design/build project delivery, however, the positive effects of cost and productivity changes were not convincing. Based on the result of the study, the project management expertise and experience of the contractor may have a greater impact on project performance outcomes than focusing on project delivery strategy only.

 

7. Jacob, W.F. and Kwak, Y.H. (2003) "In Search of Innovative Techniques to Evaluate Pharmaceutical R&D Projects" Technovation: The International Journal of Technical Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Technology Management, 23(4), pp. 291-296. doi:10.1016/S0166-4972(01)00116-X

 

ABSTRACT: This paper is a conceptual paper that examines a new integrative evaluation approach for pharmaceutical R&D projects. It describes recent changes in the health care economy and the underlying scientific and technological revolution that has markedly altered the business environment in which the pharmaceutical industry operates. Changes in cost and technology resulted from managed care organizations, marketing, generic drugs, new drug development risk, and scientific and technological evolution forced to think a new way to evaluate R&D project in the early phase of the project. These changes have placed increased emphasis on the need for improvements in technology management methodologies. A real options approach, especially when combined with other project risk management processes, offers a significant improvement in project selection and review, and resource allocation decisions.

 

6. Kwak, Y.H. (곽영훈) (2002) "Investigating Project Management Practices and Processes in 4 Different Sectors (프로 젝트관리기법 도입 적용에 대학 4 비교 분석)" Korean Management Review (경영학 ) (Flagship journal of Korean Academic Society of Business Administrations), 31(5), 1165-1183. (In Korean, abstract in English)

 

5. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (2002) "Project Management Process Maturity Model" Journal of Management in Engineering, 18(3), pp. 150-155. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0742-597X(2002)18:3(150)

 

ABSTRACT: This paper presents the Project Management Process Maturity (PM)2 model that determines and positions organization's relative project management levels with other organizations. The comprehensive model follows a systematic approach to establish an organization's current project management level. Each maturity level consists of major project management characteristics, factors, and processes. The model evolves from functionally driven organizational practices to project driven organization that incorporates continuous project learning. The (PM)2 model provides an orderly, disciplined process to achieve higher levels of project management maturity.

 

4. Kwak, Y.H. (2002) "Analyzing Asian Infrastructure Development Privatization Market" Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, 128(2), pp. 110-116. doi:101061/(ASCE)0733-9364(2002)128:2(110)

 

ABSTRACT: Concession agreement is one of the infrastructure privatization models. In Asia, the rise of concession projects began in the 1980s, and its number continues to grow. This research provides an overview and detailed analysis of the Asian concession market. 87 concession projects awarded between 1985 and 1998 covering 12 Asian countries were examined. Findings show that Asia has been implementing concession model actively in response to the high demand of infrastructure development in the power, transportation and water sectors. Approximately 30% of the total concession projects had disappointed performances resulting in financial loss, cancellation, delay, and suspension of the project.

 

3. Ibbs, C.W., Wong, C and Kwak, Y.H. (2001). "Project Change Management System" Journal of Management in Engineering, 17(3), pp. 159-165. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0742-597X(2001)17:3(159)

 

ABSTRACT: Changes in projects are common and may be deleterious or beneficial whether you see a change as a conflict or a valuable lesson depends only on your prospective. Project Changes affect the cost, the scheduling, and the duration of projects, both directly and indirectly. Despite many articles and discussion in practice and academic literature, there is a lack of information about systematic approaches to manage project change. This paper introduces a comprehensive project change management system that is founded on five principles: Promote a balanced change culture, Recognize change, Evaluate change, Implement change, and continuously improve from lessons learned. By applying project change management system, project participants can implement to minimize deleterious change and promote beneficial change.

 

2. Kwak, Y.H., and Ibbs, C.W. (2000), "Calculating Project Management's Return on Investment" Project Management Journal, 31(2), pp. 38-47.

 

ABSTRACT: This paper describes a procedure that can help managers measure their return on investment for project management (PM/ROI). Current PM processes and practices of 38 different companies and government agencies in 4 different industries or application areas were quantitatively examined. A PM benchmarking procedures was developed and used to assess the PM process maturity of these different organizations. A 5 level Berkeley PM process maturity model is introduced. This information is used to measure the relative sophistication and maturity of different organizations and industries.

 

1. Ibbs, C.W. and Kwak, Y.H. (2000), "Assessing Project Management Maturity" Project Management Journal, 31(1), pp. 32-43.

 

ABSTRACT: The principal goal of this study was to determine the financial and organizational impacts of project management. This study began with the development of a project management maturity model and an analysis methodology to assess the maturity of project management process. The project management maturity analysis methodology consists of 148 multiple choice questions that measure project management maturity and cover 8 knowledge areas and 6 project phases. The maturity model and methodology were then applied by benchmarking 38 different companies and government agencies in 4 different industries. This assessment methodology provides solid and comparative studies on project management practices across industries and companies within an industry. It also provides a set of tools for organizations to use in identifying key areas of opportunity for improvement in project management.


BOOKS, BOOK CHAPTERS, or REPORTS


 



10. Kwak, Y.H. Liu, M., Patanakul, P., and Zwikael, O. (2014). Challenges and Best Practices of Managing Government Projects and Programs. PMI Publications, ISBN: 9781628250657, 88 pages.

ABSTRACT:  On behalf of the IBM Center for The Business of Government, we are pleased to present this report, An Open Government Implementation Model: Moving to Increased Public Engagement, by Gwanhoo Lee, The American University, and Young Hoon Kwak, The George Washington University. The release of this report comes on the heels of the first anniversary of the Open Government Directive issued in December 2009. This Directive required all executive departments and agencies to take the following steps toward the goal of creating a more open government: • Publish government information online • Improve the quality of government information • Create and institutionalize a culture of open government • Create an enabling policy framework for open government. Professors Lee and Kwak present a road map — the Open Government Implementation Model — that agencies can follow in moving toward accomplishing the objectives of the Directive. The model set forth by Professors Lee and Kwak recommends that agencies should advance their open government initiatives in stages, moving from one stage to another as they mature their adoption of open government. To illustrate their path toward implementing the goals of the Directive, Professors Lee and Kwak examine five cases of open government initiatives within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), including initiatives by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Food and Drug Administration. The case studies illustrate how federal agencies are making progress in moving to a more open and transparent government.  The model can clearly be adapted by other agencies.  We trust that this report, as well as previous IBM Center reports on social media and citizen engagement, will serve as useful and informative guides to government agencies as each responds to the challenges set forth in the Open Government Directive.

This report presents an Open Government Implementation Model (OGIM) for guiding government agencies towards open government. Our model defines four implementation stages and describes the focuses, deliverables, benefits, challenges, best practices, and metrics for each stage. A key tenet of the Implementation Model is that government agencies should advance their open government initiatives incrementally, focusing on one implementation stage at a time. Starting from increasing data transparency (Stage One), the process moves on to improving open participation (Stage Two), enhancing open collaboration (Stage Three), and realizing ubiquitous engagement (Stage Four). We argue that by following this sequence, agencies can minimize risk and effectively harness the power of social media in order to engage the public.


 

 


IBM
10. Lee, G. and Kwak, Y.H. (2011). “An Open Government Implementation Model: Moving to Increased Public EngagementIBM Center for the Business of Government. 35 pages.

ABSTRACT:  On behalf of the IBM Center for The Business of Government, we are pleased to present this report, An Open Government Implementation Model: Moving to Increased Public Engagement, by Gwanhoo Lee, The American University, and Young Hoon Kwak, The George Washington University. The release of this report comes on the heels of the first anniversary of the Open Government Directive issued in December 2009. This Directive required all executive departments and agencies to take the following steps toward the goal of creating a more open government: • Publish government information online • Improve the quality of government information • Create and institutionalize a culture of open government • Create an enabling policy framework for open government. Professors Lee and Kwak present a road map — the Open Government Implementation Model — that agencies can follow in moving toward accomplishing the objectives of the Directive. The model set forth by Professors Lee and Kwak recommends that agencies should advance their open government initiatives in stages, moving from one stage to another as they mature their adoption of open government. To illustrate their path toward implementing the goals of the Directive, Professors Lee and Kwak examine five cases of open government initiatives within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), including initiatives by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Food and Drug Administration. The case studies illustrate how federal agencies are making progress in moving to a more open and transparent government.  The model can clearly be adapted by other agencies.  We trust that this report, as well as previous IBM Center reports on social media and citizen engagement, will serve as useful and informative guides to government agencies as each responds to the challenges set forth in the Open Government Directive.

This report presents an Open Government Implementation Model (OGIM) for guiding government agencies towards open government. Our model defines four implementation stages and describes the focuses, deliverables, benefits, challenges, best practices, and metrics for each stage. A key tenet of the Implementation Model is that government agencies should advance their open government initiatives incrementally, focusing on one implementation stage at a time. Starting from increasing data transparency (Stage One), the process moves on to improving open participation (Stage Two), enhancing open collaboration (Stage Three), and realizing ubiquitous engagement (Stage Four). We argue that by following this sequence, agencies can minimize risk and effectively harness the power of social media in order to engage the public.



http://home.gwu.edu/%7Ekwak/EVM.jpg
9. Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (2010). “Project Management in Government: An Introduction to Earned Value ManagementIBM Center for the Business of Government. 43 pages.

 

ABSTRACT:  On behalf of the IBM Center for The Business of Government, we are pleased to present this report, “Project Management in Government: An Introduction to Earned Value Management (EVM),” by Young Hoon Kwak, The George Washington University, and Frank T. Anbari, Drexel University.  Management of government projects, programs, and portfolios—and the related expenditures of public funds—are major, visible areas of interest and concern. Emphasis on performance improvement in government continues to increase steadily, supported by mandates imposed by government laws and public pressure. Despite a growing understanding of the determinants of success, increasing maturity, and a stream of successful programs and projects, project failures continue at an alarming rate. Earned Value Management (EVM) is a powerful methodology that gives the executive, program manager, project manager, and other stakeholders the ability to visualize a project’s status at various points during the project life cycle and consequently manage projects, programs, and portfolios more effectively. EVM helps provide objective project assessments when applied appropriately, and clearly quantifies the opportunities to maintain control over cost, schedule, and specifications of various types of projects. EVM helps managers in making evidence-based decisions about project scope, resources, and risks; hence, it allows effective control and project oversight. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been one of the pioneers in the U.S. government in using project management principles, tools, and techniques, and consistently demonstrates the effective application of EVM to the oversight and management of its many projects and programs. This report describes how NASA applies EVM principles to accomplish agency objectives, strategies, and missions. By using EVM, NASA also complies with relevant federal government regulations that require continuous monitoring and control of projects and programs.  We trust that this report will be helpful to federal government agencies, other public organizations, government contractors, and private sector organizations in adapting EVM principles to enhance the management and success of their projects, programs, and portfolios.



//home.gwu.edu/%7Ekwak/allied_disciplines.jpg
8. Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (2008) "Impact on Project Management of Allied Disciplines: Trends and Future of Project Management Practices and Research" PMI Publications, ISBN: 9781933890456. 152 pages.  Recipient of 2008 International Project Management Association (IPMA) Outstanding Research Contributions Award.

 

ABSTRACT: Though project management can be traced back thousands of years, it is only recently that organizations have begun to apply systematic and scientific tools and techniques to manage complex projects. Recently, researchers and practitioners have adapted different academic disciplines to contribute to the body of knowledge in project management. Such disciplines as network scheduling techniques, decision-making tools, resource allocations and optimization approaches come from the Management Science discipline. Organizational dynamics theories provide insight and recognize the benefits of project driven organizations. Supply chain management and business process outsourcing have also impacted organizational effectiveness and attitude on managing projects. Project management is greatly affected by allied disciplines and in return, it influences them. Therefore, innovative theories, trends and challenges discovered through investigating allied disciplines of project management have important implications and allocations in the future of project management. Impact on Project Management of Allied Disciplines is a collection of academic studies related to trends in allied disciplines of project management and how they might significantly impact project management in the future.



ct
            Manager's Handbook
7. Kwak, Y.H. (2007). “Evaluating Project Management Effectiveness of Boston Big Dig and Three Gorges Dam in China” Chapter 14 in Project Manager's Handbook: Applying Best Practices Across Global Industries, Cleland, D.I. and Ireland, L.R. (editors), McGraw-Hill. ISBN: 0071484426, Sep.

 

ABSTRACT: Implementing the processes, practices, tools, and techniques of project management are essential to project success, particularly for large projects. The requirements, resources, and complexity of engineering and construction projects are greatly larger than the average projects, and applying project management principles is a must. This chapter discusses project management effectiveness of two mega projects in the engineering and construction industry. Boston Central/Artery Tunnel project and Three Gorges Dam Project in China are selected to analyze the level of application of project management processes. The goal of this chapter is to identify the opportunities and lessons learned for implementing and improving project management practices for large engineering and construction projects.



            Story Cover
6. Kwak, Y.H. (2005). "Brief History of Project Management" Chapter 1 in The Story of Managing Projects: An Interdisciplinary Approach.  Carayannis, E.G., Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (editors). Praeger Publishers. ISBN: 1-5670-506-2, Feb.



            Story Cover
5. Carayannis, E.G., Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (editors) (2005). The Story of Managing Projects: An Interdisciplinary Approach. Praeger Publishers. ISBN: 1-5670-506-2, Feb.

 

ABSTRACT: Project management has been practiced for thousands of years, but only recently have organizations begun to apply systematic management tools and techniques to manage complex projects. Today's approaches to project management can be traced directly to methodologies designed by the U.S. military and Department of Defense in the years after World War II. Subsequent advances in management information systems have helped to codify project management practices; most recently, the Internet has dramatically enhanced the ability of individuals, teams, and organizations to manage projects across continents and cultures in real time. The Story of Managing Projects showcases cutting-edge research conducted around the world on emerging practices in project management. Covering an enormous spectrum of subjects and industries--from an upgrade of the Greek railway system to infrastructure reconstruction in Kuwait--the authors explore the full range of inter-personal, technical, and organizational dynamics of project management, contributing new insights to its theory and application.


4. Kwak, Y.H., Doherty, J., Mambelli, A., Mourad, A., and Speranzo, J. (2004) “The Springfield Interchange Implementation Project” Chapter in Case Studies in Project Management. Anbari, F.T. (editor), PMI Publications, ISBN: 1930699360., Dec

 

3. Kwak, Y.H., Chernyaeva, O., Spector, T., and Wu, A. (2004) “The Glasgow Science Centre Tower Project” Chapter in Case Studies in Project Management. Anbari, F.T. (editor), PMI Publications, ISBN: 1930699360., Dec



_PM_ Guide
2. Ibbs, C.W., Reginato, J. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004). "Developing Project Management Capability – Benchmarking, Maturity, Modeling, Gap Analyses, ROI Studies". Chapter 48 in The Wiley Guide to Managing Projects. Peter W. G. Morris (Editor), Jeffrey K. Pinto (Editor) John Wiley ISBN: 0-471-23302-1. 1440 pages. September 2004.

 

ABSTRACT: How good are your organization’s Project Management (PM) practices? How well do your practices compare with those of your peers in the business world? Are you making the appropriate investments in new PM systems, processes, and practices? These are the questions that few firms can answer directly and accurately. Yet their answers can unlock the gate to superior business performance. The first step in understanding an organization’s PM effectiveness is to determine its Project Management Maturity (PMM). By having a grasp of where a company lies on the PMM spectrum, management can determine its PM strengths and weaknesses, which is enormous value in today’s highly competitive, project-oriented marketplace. Stated simply, a company’s PMM is a measure of its current PM sophistication and capability. Knowledge about the most sophisticated PM tools does not necessarily mean that those complicated tools will be used on every project. Rather, appropriate knowledge means that the firm and its managers understand which PM tool is appropriate for the demands of the project. PMM helps gauge such management wisdom. Once PMM is known, it can be used to both understand the company’s current standing and to develop a roadmap for future improvements in PM processes and practices. Once on the path to such PM enlightenment, companies can craft their PM capabilities and strategy to enhance competitive advantage and wealth creation. The purpose of this chapter is to describe how PMM benchmarking can help organizations develop that roadmap. We will do this by first highlighting the importance of PMM in today’s competitive marketplace. Secondly, we will exhibit techniques for determining current levels of PMM and defining a course for PMM improvement. Lastly, we will demonstrate methods to enumerate the value of PM improvement to ensure that investments in PM are reaping the desired returns.



i
                book
1. Ibbs, C.W. and Kwak, Y.H., The Benefits of Project Management- Financial and Organizational Rewards to Corporations, PMI Publications, Sept. 1997, ISBN: 1-880410-32-X. 90 pages.

 

ABSTRACT: In today's highly competitive, resource-scarce, Internet-time based world, project management has truly come into its own as an organizational discipline that must be in top form if the organization is to flourish. It's essential, therefore, to establish a benchmarking process for users of project management, to assess their levels of project maturity, and to formulate ways to improve their levels of project management. The Benefits of Project Management is your first step in establishing that process.  This study presents the organizational and financial benefits to organizations that result from the implementation of project management tools, processes, and practices. In particular, it looks at the return on investment that organizations realize by investing in all aspects of project management.  The book provides a vehicle for estimating what kind of project management return on investment improvement you can expect from taking certain actions to increase your project management maturity, enabling you to justify the investment of money and effort to achieve their goal. Such information will help you better understand the cost effectiveness of project management. It will also help you make more prudent project management investment decisions.


CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS (PEER-REVIEWED AND ARCHIVED ONLY)


41. Kwak, Y.H., Patanakul, P, Liu, M., and Zwikael, O. (2014) “Lessons Learned from Investigating Large Government Projects and Programs” 2014 PMI Research and Education Conference, Portland, Oregon, July 27-29, 2014.

 

40. Sadatsafavai, H., Walewski, J., Williams, N.L., and Kwak, Y.H. (2014) “Evolution of Project Based Organization: A Case Study” 4th Conference of the International Network of Business and Management, Barcelona, Spain, June 25-27, 2014.

 

39. Ghosh, S., Amaya, L., and Kwak, Y.H. (2014) “Knowledge Governance Model for Successful Projects” 23rd International Management of Technology Annual Conference, Washington, DC, May 22-26, 2014.

 

38. Park, C. and Kwak, Y.H. (2014) “Project Ecosystem Competency Model” 23rd International Management of Technology Annual Conference, Washington, DC, May 22-26, 2014.

 

37. Choi, K., Ryoo, B.Y., and Kwak, Y.H. (2013). “Cluster-Driven Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Model for Transportation Infrastructure Improvement Projects.” UKC 2013, East Rutherford, NJ, August 7-11.

 

36. Gosh S., Kwak Y.H., and Cheerla A. (2013) “Dimensions and Codes of Good Project Governance” 11th International Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) conference, Oslo, Norway, June 17-19, 2013.

 

ABSTRACT: The rise of attention to projects as primary vehicle to execute corporate strategic objectives has questioned if projects can steer itself in a difficult situation, which can be done if proper project governance is in place. Despite the large body of literature in project governance and recent up rise in interests in project governance, there is no comprehensive study to understand what is ‘good project governance’? Borrowing ideas from social science, the article examine codes of good project governance. A set of code of good project governance was developed as a set of based on a case study which was conducted to examine the concept of good project governance and identify list of observations related to project governance. This paper aims to be inclusive rather than exclusive, to encourage discussions of all the dimensions of good project governance.

 

35. Ahn, Y.H. Kwak, Y.H. and, Suk, S.J. (2013) “Organizational Transformation Strategies for Adopting Building Information Modeling in the Engineering-Construction Industry” The 5th International Conference on Construction Engineering and Project Management, Anaheim, CA, Jan 9-11, 2013.

 

ABSTRACT: The architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry is beginning to utilize Building Information Modeling (BIM), benefiting from the resulting improved visualization and productivity, better coordination of construction drawings, building documents that contain embedded links to virtual information, faster delivery, and lower costs. However, construction firms often face challenges when reorganizing their company structure to take full advantage of these benefits. This paper proposes an organizational structure that will enable engineering-construction firms to successfully adopt and implement BIM for major construction projects. A case study research method is utilized based on in-depth interviews with four BIM directors and vice presidents charged with BIM adoption, implementation and education. Organizational transformation challenges and recommendations are discussed in detail for those considering implementing BIM in the engineering-construction industry. Topics such as organizational changes in the firm, costs and benefits of BIM implementation, strategies of BIM implementation (execution) plan, BIM education, risks and opportunities associated with BIM, BIM software, contract methods, human resource management and new hires, and the future implementation and direction of BIM are discussed in detail.

 

34. Suh, M.J. Pearce, A.R., and Kwak, Y.H. (2013) “The Effect of LEED Certified Building on The Surrounding Neighborhood in New York CityThe 5th International Conference on Construction Engineering and Project Management, Anaheim, CA, Jan 9-11, 2013.

 

ABSTRACT: The construction industry has introduced the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system to promote objective evaluations of the sustainability of buildings. Three important values to consider when implementing sustainability are the associated environmental, social, and economic impacts. Recently, researchers have begun to investigate the real estate value of LEED certified buildings in terms of the rental cost, occupancy rate, cost per unit area, and resale value in order to better understand the economic benefits of the LEED rating system. However, the economic benefits also encompass economic effects such as the impact of LEED certified buildings on neighborhood real estate values surrounding the certified buildings. This research examines whether the enhanced real estate value of LEED certified buildings in New York City extends to surrounding commercial buildings, utilizing spatial analysis via a Geographic Information System (GIS) and the hedonic pricing method to derive meaningful economic relationships. The results provide practical insights into the economic effect of LEED certified buildings that will be of interest to city officials and planners, as well as the owners, developers, investors and other stakeholders of surrounding buildings.

 

33. Kwak, Y.H. (2012) “Lessons Learned from the History of Hoover Dam Project” US-Korea Conference on Science, Technology, and Entrepreneurship (UKC 2012), Los Angeles, CA, Aug 8-11, 2012.

 

ABSTRACT: The objective of this research is to explore project and program management techniques unique to the building of the Hoover Dam, and how these factors contributed to the establishment and evolution of modern project management practices. This research also examines the organizational and managerial best practices as well as the lessons learned associated with the planning and construction of the Hoover Dam in order to create common ground for both academics and practitioners, and contribute to the project management body of knowledge.

 

32. Kwak, Y.H., Liu, M., Patanakul, P., and Zwikael, O. (2012) “Strategic Management of High-Risk Government Mega Projects and Programs” PMI Research and Education Conference, Limerick, Ireland, July 15-18, 2012.

 

ABSTRACT: The application and performance of project, program, and portfolio management in government is historically poor as reported by United States Government Accountability Office, United Kingdom’s National Audit Office, Australian National Audit Office, and others.  The goal of this research is to propose a strategic roadmap for successful implementation of project, program, and portfolio management in government.  This presentation will analyze the performance of past and on-going high-risk government projects by identifying factors of success/failure of government projects and programs from a global perspective. The panel will also identify common reasons for poor project performance in high-risk government, analyze relationships between the performance of government projects and programs and their characteristics (e.g. budget size, duration, scope, and team composition), and report key lessons learned and provide recommendations to improve the project management performance in high-risk government programs.  The panelists are particularly interested in mega projects as many of the government initiated or government-funded projects are large, complex, and high-risk.  Three major sectors in the government have been identified to evaluate and analyze project management practices and performance: Transportation/infrastructure; defense/space; and information systems development and deployment.

 

31. Lee, G. and Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “A Maturity Model for Technology-Enabled Open Government”, Pre-ICIS eGovernment Workshop, Shanghai, China, December 4, 2011.

 

30. Ghosh, S., Boswell, J., Kwak, Y.H., and Skibniewski, M. (2011) “Risk Governance Framework for Enterprise Wide Application Implementations”, IEEE International Technology Management Conference (ITMC)-2011, San Jose, CA, June 27-30.

 

ABSTRACT: Enterprise Application Systems (EAS) are strategic enablers for businesses impacting multiple business areas such as financials, accounting, supply chain, customer services, and human resources. EAS implementations are highly complex implementations that automate several business functions, involving several internal and external resources. EAS create value for the adopter if the implemented solution is sustainable. Due to the complex nature of multi-party, multi-level risk association during different phases of the project life cycle all EAS projects require proper risk governance framework to empower proper risk identification, evaluation and mitigation authority within the project organization to execute. The concept of risk governance - referring to the risk governance of a single project - has remained ambiguous in existing studies. In the research, we review literature from multiple viewpoints to a novel definition and interpretation about inclusive risk governance concept. Inclusive risk governance provides a multi-phase, multi-step process with a set of principles, checks, and balances that govern risk-related decision making in an effort to reduce the odds of project failure that may result from a set of identifiable risks that involves project ecology risks. That is why it is important to know how relevant risk information is collected, analyzed, and communicated, and management decisions are taken involving all the stakeholders. When these questions go beyond the conventional risk management, the involvement of all stakeholders is required; therefore, in such a situation there is a need of inclusive governance. Inclusive risk governance is based on the assumption that all stakeholders have something to contribute to the process of risk governance and that mutual communication and exchange of ideas, assessments, and evaluations improve the final decisions rather than impede the decision-making process or compromise the quality of scientific input and the l- - egitimacy of legal requirements. Therefore, we have developed a theoretical approach to the inclusive risk governance process. This article develops a framework of risk governance by discussing a range of institutional possibilities for participation from the implementation ecosystem.

 

29. Ghosh, S., Negahban, S., Kwak, Y.H., and Skibniewski, M. (2011) “Impact of Sustainability on Integration and Interoperability between BIM and ERP- A Governance Framework”, IEEE International Technology Management Conference (ITMC)-2011, San Jose, CA, June 27-30.

 

ABSTRACT: The majority of construction organizations that have either failed in their efforts to adopt enterprise wide applications and related technology, or are simply not familiar with it, are the Small to Medium Size Construction Organizations (SMSCO). Their failure or refusal to adopt complex IT systems impacts their ability to integrate in the construction lifecycle as well ability to integrate newer technologies e.g. building information modeling (BIM) systems. As more and more organizations attempt to integrate BIM models that have sustainable design issues imbedded with enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, they will discover that whole new set of integration issues will need to be addressed. The intent of this research would be to identify and address these issues. BIM represents the building as an integrated database of coordinated information. Therefore one of the main areas of the interested in sphere of interoperability between sustainable BIM and ERP when it comes to integration has to be data exchange platforms. Other areas that will need to be reviewed and studied are; impact of LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) required documentation, Sustainable design guidelines, Building Systems, Environmental Realities, and cost. The ability to govern and integrate with construction lifecycle is key to sustainability, despite all its potential benefits, is the problem that is addressed in this research. In this research, we propose that project governance practices and the organizational capacity to manage the multi-party associations in complex projects can be integrated through a sustainable governance process.

 

28. Lee, G. and Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “Open Government Implementation Model: A Stage Model for Achieving Increased Public Engagement12th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research (dg.o 2011): Digital Government Innovation in Challenging Times, College Park MD, June 12–15 2011.

 

ABSTRACT: The main objective of this research is to propose and present the Open Government Implementation Model (OGIM), which is a stage model that prescribes and guides government agencies on their journey to open government. The OGIM defines four implementation stages and describes the focuses, deliverables, benefits, challenges, best practices, and metrics for each stage. A thesis of the OGIM states that government agencies should advance their open government initiatives in a progressive and orderly manner by focusing on one implementation stage at a time, starting from increasing data transparency (Stage 1), and then moving on to improving open participation (Stage 2), enhancing open collaboration (Stage 3), and realizing ubiquitous engagement (Stage 4). We argue that, by following this sequence, agencies can minimize risk and effectively harness the power of social media in order to engage the public.

 

27. Young, L., Valerdi, R., Farr, J., and Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “An Approach to Estimate the Life Cycle Cost and Effort of Project Management for Systems Centric Projects”, 2011 International Society of Parametric Analysts (ISPA) and the Society of Cost Estimating and Analysis (SCEA) Conference, Albuquerque, NM, June 7-10, 2011.

 

ABSTRACT: One of the key challenges in predicting life cycle costs (LCCs) is to develop an accurate top down method that can be used in the early phase of a system’s life cycle to estimate hardware, software, integration, and management costs. Models have been developed for systems engineering (SE) costing components of management, but the literature is void of project management (PM) costing methodologies. The lack of costing capability can cause project cost estimates to be unreliable and escalate to actual cost overrun, and ultimately lead to unfavorable financial performance and project outcome. Thus, the research study proposes a framework for evaluating PM costs required for the conceptualization, design, test, and deployment of large-scale systems centric projects. The ultimate goal of the research study is to construct a cost estimating model that can accurately and consistently predict the appropriate and adequate amount of PM effort for systems centric projects. The proposed framework consists of two PM cost models which are investigated by this research effort via a series of surveys and interviews with industry PM practitioners and subject matter experts. The first proposed PM model is a synthesis of the Constructive Systems Engineering Cost Model (COSYSMO) framework with variations on the effort multipliers that are primarily driven by PM functions and characteristics commonly seen throughout aerospace and defense systems projects. The primary goal of the first proposed model is to determine the cost relationship between SE project size and PM effort, and whether PM cost and effort is proportional to SE cost and effort for aerospace and defense projects. The second proposed model is developed based on the PM processes, activities, attributes and characteristics that are universally shared and practiced by PM practitioners across various projects and industries. The focus of the second proposed model is to determine and construct a cost relationship based on project factors that dictate PM functions and characteristics, which are multiplicatively impacted by PM efficiency. This PM functions-driven model estimates the PM cost and effort required for systems development projects, regardless of its industry origin, to support PM practitioners and cost estimators across different domains. The study is expected to provide several benefits that help project sponsors and cost estimators measure and quantify PM effort, ultimately generating reliable PM cost estimates. Project sponsors and cost estimators who utilize the proposed cost estimating models can expect their projects to receive specific benefits, which include: 1. Determine adequate amount of resources needed for PM effort, 2. Produce reliable and defensible cost estimates for PM effort, 3. Allocate appropriate amount of PM resources for specific PM functions, and 4. Allow more robust and accurate project planning and tracking of cost and resources. Moreover, once both 2 proposed models are validated and verified by industry experts and data, the research study can further measure and compare the accuracy and consistency given in each model to determine the applicability and appropriateness of each model for specific industry usage and calibration.

 

26. Choi, K., Lee, E.B., Kwak, Y.H., and Pyeon, J.H. (2011). “Optimal Incentive/Disincentive Predictive Model for Transportation Projects” 2nd International Conference on Transportation Construction Management, Federal Highway Administration, Orlando, FL, Feb. 7-10, 2011.

 

ABSTRACT: Over the years, tools and methods for determining Incentives/Disincentives (I/D) amounts have advanced, but these tools still have crucial limitations insofar as they cannot concurrently account for project-specific peculiarities, Contractor’s Additional Cost (CAC), total savings to road users and to the agency, and reasonable adjustments of total savings. The objective of this study is to develop a predictive decision-support model that determines the realistic I/D amounts by combining an existing scheduling simulation with a statistical method. First, schedule and traffic simulations using Construction Analysis for Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies (CA4PRS) was conducted to create contractor’s time-cost tradeoff data and to build road user cost lookup tables. Then, a linear regression analysis was performed to predict CAC growth rate by analyzing how the CAC interacts with the agency’s specific schedule goal. The model employs an integrated analysis to capture project schedule, CAC, and total savings concurrently and to determine the optimal incentive that exceeds the CAC growth (lower bound) for cutting down construction times and be less than a portion of the decrease in total time value savings to road users and to the agency (upper bound). Two case studies were presented to validate the robustness of the proposed model. Applying a model that predicts an appropriate I/D amount will result in significant monetary savings to the agencies and better use of public funds for future infrastructure projects.

 

25. Choi, K. Kwak, Y.H., and Yu, B. (2010) “Quantitative Model for Determining Incentive/Disincentive Amounts through Schedule Simulations”, 2010 Winter Simulation Conference, Baltimore, MD, Dec. 5-8, 2010.

 

ABSTRACT: One groundbreaking way of expediting any construction is to offer contractors a monetary incentive. To be effective, the incentive amount should be larger than the contractor’s additional cost (CAC) for expediting construction time. Yet, estimating the CAC poses a major challenge because contractors are reluctant to disclose their profit information. This study introduces a quantitative model that estimates realistic CACs through schedule simulations on four different resource usage levels. An innovative and reliable tool called Construction Analysis for Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies (CA4PRS) was used for the simulation. Using CA4PRS, a set of contractors’ time-cost tradeoff data was created and a linear regression analysis was performed to predict the CAC growth rate and to analyze how this interacts with the agency’s specified schedule goal. The robustness of the proposed model was also validated through a case study. This model can assist decision-makers to make better decisions when estimating optimal incentive amounts.

 

24. Young, L., Farr, J., Valerdi, R., and Kwak, Y.H. (2010) “A Framework for Evaluating Life Cycle Project Management Costs on Systems Centric Projects”, American Society for Engineering Management 2010, 31st Annual Conference, Rogers, AR., October 13-16, 2010.

 

ABSTRACT: One of the key challenges in predicting life cycle costs (LCCs) is to develop an accurate top down method that can be used in the early phase of system’s life cycle to estimate hardware, software, integration, and management costs. Models have been developed for systems engineering (SE) costing component of management, but the literature is void of project management (PM) costing methodologies. Thus, we propose a framework for evaluating PM costs required for the conceptualization, design, test, and deployment of large-scale systems centric projects. The elements of management in classes of PM and SE were identified. We determined potential PM cost-drivers by reviewing standard work breakdown structure (WBS) elements, hardware and software development, and integration tasks. We then correlated several PM cost indicators to factors that have effects on SE cost adjustment factors. This paper addresses a qualitative model and hopes to lay the foundation for a quantitative methodology in the future.

 

23. Kwak, Y.H. (2010) “Project Portfolio Management (PPM) - Strategic and Operational Agility through Projects” Project Management Institute Research Conference, Washington, DC, July 11-14, 2010.

 

22. Anbari F.T. and Kwak, Y.H. (2009) “Trends of Project Management Research” 2009 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Chicago, Aug 7-11, 2009.

 

21. Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (2008) “Project Management Research Trends of Allied Disciplines” 2008 PMI Research Conference, Warsaw, Poland, July 13-16, 2008.

 

ABSTRACT: This study looks at project management from the perspective of its relationship to allied disciplines in the management field. By exploring, identifying, and classifying management journal articles of PM allied disciplines, the evolution and trends of PM research are revealed. This study specifically investigates the research in allied disciplines from the management academy’s viewpoint, instead of looking at project management research trends from the project management community’s perspective. The goal of this research is to better understand project management from the management world and argues that project management is a legitimate academic discipline by reviewing research trends of its allied disciplines. To thoroughly investigate project management research in allied disciplines, it is necessary to review major journal publications in the management and business field. Since the management and business field is very broad, this research identified and defined eight different categories of allied disciplines in project management. Then, we have selected 18 top business and management academic journals that published articles related to project management to review and categorize journal articles into these eight different areas. By chronologically analyzing and categorizing more than 500 journal articles from the 18 journals in the business field published from 1950s to summer of 2007, this study analyzes publications trends of different domains (Operations Research vs. Organizational Behavior vs. Practice) and different journals and predict the future of project management as an academic discipline in the mainstream management research.

 

20. Kwak, Y.H., Wetter, J., and Anbari, F.T. (2006) “Business Process Best Practices: Project Management or Six Sigma?” 2006 PMI Research Conference, Montreal, Canada, July 16-19, 2006.

 

ABSTRACT: This paper examines two important business processes currently in wide use or under consideration for adoption by major organizations in many industries. The processes under study are Six Sigma and Project Management. The paper discusses the relationship between Six Sigma and Project Management by comparing the tools used in each methodology. The tools become a filter to empirically identify and describe the relationship between the two. Various quality improvement tools are identified and categorized into Six Sigma methodology. The paper examines Six Sigma methodology and compares and contrasts Project Management and Six Sigma in the context of their tools and techniques. Understanding the interrelationship between Six Sigma and Project Management can help management streamline organizational initiative, enhance alignment of purpose, and achieve the synergistic effects possible by integrating the two methodologies.

 

19. Ryoo, B.Y., Skibniewski, M.J., and Kwak, Y.H. (2006) “E-Business Solutions in the Construction Industry in Korea: National Construction IT Plans and their Implementation in the Public Construction Sector” 2006 Information Resource Management Association, 17th Annual IRMA International Conference, Washington, DC, May 21-24, 2006.

 

18. Anbari, F.T. and Kwak, Y.H. (2005) “Six Sigma, Programs and Proactive Risk Management” Project Management Challenge 2005, Second Annual NASA Project Management Conference, College Park, MD, March 22-23, 2005.

 

ABSTRACT: In the design and implementation of its strategy, an organization needs to integrate two major goals to enhance its effectiveness, efficiency, and adaptability: 1) Improvement of its current products, services, and processes. This goal can be pursued through Six Sigma and quality initiatives, and 2) Planning and introduction of new products, services, processes, and technologies. This goal can be carried out as coordinated projects and programs. Successful implementation and growing organizational interest in the Six Sigma method have been exploding in recent years. It is rapidly becoming a major force driving the strategy of numerous successful organizations. Application of the Six Sigma method can reduce project execution risks and enhance the effectiveness of organizational risk management. Involvement in Six Sigma projects is becoming an important career path requirement in many organizations. Understanding the main concepts of the Six Sigma method provides project and program professionals important opportunities in Six Sigma leadership, and proactive program risk management. It allows them to better support their organizations’ project coaching, mentoring, and training needs.

 

17. Watson, R. and Kwak, Y.H. (2005) “Conceptual Estimating of Deployment Costs for Technology-Driven Projects” Project Estimation Conference (Internal), IBM Academy of Technology, Boulder, Co, Jan 24-26, 2005.

 

16. Watson, R. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Development of a Parametric Estimating Model for Technology-Driven Deployment Project." 2004 Winter Simulation Conference, Washington, DC, December 5-8, 2004.

 

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this paper is to define the process used to develop a parametric estimating model and to explain the use of the model as it allows a non subject matter expert to predict the cost of deployment of a technology-driven project with improved accuracy. The overall objective is to define criteria for organizations to use as a rule of thumb estimating model for deter-mining potential resource requirements during the pre-concept and concept phase of a technology-driven project. The use of the model will determine the complexity level of a project and then using a matrix simulating the task complexity knowledge of a deployment subject matter expert, the organization deployment resource required will be estimated based upon responses to certain inquiries.  The user of the model will then have the capability to modify the output  to derive their specific deployment estimates.

 

15. Chang, H. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Lessons Learned from Spatial Database Infrastructure Projects in Developing Countries." Sixth World Congress on Computational Mechanics, Information Technology for Management of Infrastructure Mini-Symposium, Beijing, China, September 5-10, 2004.

 

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and discuss the potential barriers of SDI implementation projects of various cities in developing countries and identify the key lessons learned from those projects.  Different projects are reviewed in terms of resources, institutional organization, and data standards and information access. The projects are selected from cities developing countries in South Asia, Middle East, Europe, Latin America, North America and Africa. Many cities have plans to implement SDI projects in the coming future.  By examining the strengths and weaknesses of various SDI projects in developing countries, project managers and city officials who are planning and implementing the SDI projects will be able to better understand and establish urban policy for public infrastructure administration.  Improved quality of infrastructure management by successful implementation of SDI projects will enhance urban economic activity and improve administration. Also, efficient documentation and monitoring of infrastructure information will greatly assist fiscally stressed local governments, where property taxes are the main source of local government revenues in developing countries.

 

14. Chang, H. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Urban Spatial Database Infrastructure: Issues in Developing Countries." ASEM 04'(Advances in Structural Engineering and Mechanics), Infrastructure and Information Technology Session, Seoul, Korea, September 2-4, 2004.

 

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this research is to investigate the Spatial Database Infrastructure (SDI) implementation projects of various cities in developing countries and identify the key lessons learned from those projects. Different projects are reviewed in terms of resources, institutional organization, data standards, and information access. By examining the obstacles and opportunities of various SDI projects in developing countries, project managers and city officials will be able to better understand and establish, plan, and implement urban SDI systems in the future. External funds or technical assistances can help the SDI implementation, only when they are supported by decision makers’ strong commitment and continued internal supports. Some cities found that the collaboration between academic institutions and local governments is an effective way to build and train human resources where there is scarce infrastructure in training. In general, weak political, financial, and administrative supports were obstacles to project success when implementing SDI. Finally, clear and concrete data standards are the requirements to share spatial information between institutions and public.

 

13. Anbari, F.T. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Success Factors in Managing Six Sigma Projects." 2004 Project Management Institute Research Conference, London, UK, July 11-14, 2004.

 

ABSTRACT: Six Sigma is a project-driven business systems improvement method. Successful implementation and growing organizational interest in the Six Sigma method have been exploding in recent years. It is rapidly becoming a major force driving the strategy of numerous successful organizations. This paper examines the main factors driving the success of Six Sigma projects. It addresses the elements of strategic selection and effective management of Six Sigma projects. It considers the organizational structure used and the roles of various participants in achieving technical, financial and customer satisfaction objectives of each Six Sigma project. It presents the methodologies used in managing Six Sigma projects for both process improvement and new development projects. It reviews the approach used for evaluating the success of these projects. The paper synthesizes the lessons learned from successful management of Six Sigma projects and their potential applications in managing traditional projects, and considers further improvements to the methodologies used for managing Six Sigma projects. It addresses wider applications of these promising practices to organizational change management.

 

12. Watson, R. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Parametric Estimating in the Knowledge Age: Capitalizing on Technological Advances." IAMOT 2004 13th International Conference on Management of Technology, Washington, DC, April 3-7, 2004.

 

ABSTRACT: As society moves deeper into the knowledge age, speed of execution has become a differentiator and a competitive advantage. Innovation is recognized as a desired asset in all operational areas of a business. Due to the effect of competition requiring internal organizations to be self sustaining, the concept of a business model itself is taking on currently unrecognizable characteristics. Technology will continue to be leveraged to support business processes necessary to compete in a global economy. Productivity increases will result as organizations improve their abilities to create, capture and share knowledge. These technologies will bring new insight and perspectives to complex issues that will allow us to gain a better understanding of the interactions and relationships to effect positive change. This paper will focus on enhancing competitiveness with respect to parametric project cost estimating by explaining how parametric estimating techniques impact a technology driven project and its organization.

 

11. Kwak, Y.H. (2003) "Perceptions and Practices of Project Risk Management: Aggregating 300 Project Manager Years." 2003 PMI Global Congress, Baltimore, MD, Sept 21-23, 2003.

ABSTRACT: Project Risk Management practices, tools, and techniques have emerged as one of the hottest topics in the project management field.  However, risk management practice has not been fully matured or implemented in various organizations, therefore there is a need to assess where the current practice stands and try to identify room for improvement in implementing project risk management.  As a course coordinator of project risk management at project management program at the George Washington University, the presenter has been actively facilitating discussions related to project risk management.  This presentation will report the perceptions and practices of project risk management by collecting more than 300 years of project managers’ experiences.

 

10. Kwak, Y.H. (2002) "Critical Success Factors in International Development Project Management." CIB 10th International Symposium Construction Innovation & Global Competitiveness, Cincinnati, Ohio, Sept. 9-13, 2002.

 

ABSTRACT: This paper elaborates a conceptual framework for international development project management and the characteristics of international development projects, which should be taken into consideration during the project initiation and project planning phases in order to enhance project success. This paper also identifies the factors that cause completed or in progress international development projects to be challenged. The factors have been classified into ten categories based on their nature.  These cover issues of political, legal, cultural, technical, managerial, economical, environmental, social, corruption, and physical.  This paper describes these factors with a view to understand their nature from the perspective of the project managers who are required to manage international development projects.

 

9. Kwak, Y.H. and Dewan, S. (2001). "Risk Management in International Development Projects." 2001 Project Management Institute Annual Seminars and Symposiums, Nashville, TN, Nov. 4-7, 2001.

 

ABSTRACT: The objective of this paper is to identify risks associated with international development projects and devise risk mitigation strategies. The paper classifies international project risks in terms of risk sources and natures. A competent international development project manager should identify and evaluate risks, and devise strategies to mitigate their impact for achieving development project goals successfully.

 

8. Kwak, Y.H. (2001) "Examining the History of Project Office." Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) Annual Meeting 2001, Miami Beach, FL, Nov. 4-7, 2001.

 

ABSTRACT: We examine and review the history and emerging trends of the project office. The evolution of the project office is aligned with the history of project management tools and methodologies, technological innovations and maturity of management science. The project office evolves along with the technological breakthrough and progressive project management functions and practices.

 

7. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W (2000). "The Berkeley Project Management Process Maturity Model: Measuring the Value of Project Management." 2000 IEEE EMS International Engineering Management Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Aug. 13-15, 2000, pp. 1-5.

 

ABSTRACT: The purpose of the Berkeley Project Management Process Maturity Model and an associated Assessment Methodology is to help organizations and people accomplish higher and more sophisticated PM maturity by a systematic and incremental approach. It measures, locates, and compares an organization's current PM maturity level. The primary advantage of using this model and methodology is that it is generalized across industries, whereas other maturity models have specific audiences like software development or new product development. The Maturity Model and Assessment technique has already been used to benchmark PM practices and processes in 43 companies. With it, we have also identified relationships between levels of organizational effectiveness and actual project performance data. The model is continuously being refined to reflect advances in our PM knowledge.  Some of the most recent improvements include evaluating Replicabiltiy of Project Success, which will be the focus of this paper and presentation.

 

6. Kwak, Y.H. and Dai, C (2000). "Assessing the Value of Project Management Offices (PMO)." Project Management Institute Research Conference 2000, PMI, Paris, France, Jun 21-24, 2000, pp. 333-338.

 

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to assess the value of Project Management Offices (PMO) in the organizations. First, the study conducts an in-depth literature review on Project Management Office. Then the research suggests a systematic approach that quantitatively measures the value of PMO. This model will enable to assess the current PMO level and addresses the strengths and weaknesses of PMO characteristics. The approach also conducts an analysis to correlate effectiveness of PMO with the actual project performance to determine meaningful relationships.  The study will provide potentially useful insights and guidelines for adoption or improvement in the use of PMO to enhance the successful project outcomes.

 

5. Kwak, Y.H. and Bushey, R. (2000), "Construction Management at Risk: An Innovative Project Delivery Method at Stormwater Treatment Area in the Everglades, Florida" Proceedings of ASCE Construction Congress VI, Orlando, Florida, Feb. 20-22, 2000. pp. 477-482.

 

ABSTRACT: The traditional method of contracting for the construction of a residential or commercial development, infrastructure, schools, and government facilities has been the “low bid” approach. There are other project delivery methods which have been successfully utilized in the State of Florida. Design/Build is the most widely understood alternative project delivery method and is currently successfully employed in many construction projects throughout Florida and the world. A need to mix the best of both of these project delivery methods and provide greater owner interaction in the design and construction process lead to the development of the Construction Management at Risk (CM@Risk) project delivery method. The purpose of this paper is to familiarize the audience with the CM at Risk process. First it compares its benefits with the traditional and design/build approaches. Then, the paper explores the benefits of the CM@Risk project delivery method for the construction of Stormwater Treatment Area 3/4 (STA 3/4), the largest of the STAs in the Everglades Construction Project.

 

4. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (1997),"Quantitative Benchmarking of Project Management (PM) Processes." Proceedings of ASCE Construction Congress V, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Oct. 5-9, 1997. pp. 980-987.

 

ABSTRACT: This study, sponsored by the Project Management Institute (PMI), examines current PM levels and practices in various companies and industries.  First, this research develops a five level PM Process Maturity Model to better understand levels of PM sophistication.  Second, a PM process maturity benchmarking methodology is developed and presented to measure an organization’s current PM level quantitatively.  This paper summarizes the initial results of PM process maturity benchmarking.  It also analyzes the quantitative relations between an organization's PM maturity and its PM effectiveness by applying this research methodology.

 

3. Ibbs, C.W. and Kwak, Y.H. (1997), "Financial and Organizational Impacts of Project Management." Proceedings of the 28th Annual PMI Seminars & Symposium, Chicago, Illinois, Sept. 29- Oct. 1, 1997. pp. 496-500.

 

ABSTRACT: This paper summarizes research sponsored by the Project Management Institute (PMI) Educational Foundation and PMI's Northern California Chapter, and conducted by a team from the University of California at Berkeley. The goal of this research is to measure the Return on Investment for Project Management (PM/ROI). It does this by quantitatively examining current PM processes and practices of 38 different companies and government agencies in 4 different industries. A PM Benchmarking procedure is used to assess the PM Process Maturity of these different organizations.

 

2. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (1996), "Financial and Organizational impacts of project management." Organization and Management of construction: shaping theory and practice vol. 2; Managing the construction project and managing risk, 8th International Symposium W65 Commission, London; E&FN Spon 1996. pp. 252-263.

 

ABSTRACT: This paper summarizes proposed PM process maturity analysis methodology which can be used to evaluate financial and organizational impacts of PM to organizations.  Also, a benchmarking system is developed and presented to quantitatively measure an organization's level of PM sophistication.  This research is currently in progress.  This benchmarking methodology and the resulting quantitative data will aid managers in making wiser PM investment decisions.  Future research will continue to report quantitative results and findings by applying this research methodology.

 

1. Kwak, Y.H., Clark, A., Grilo, A., Betts, M., Ibbs, C.W. (1995), "Contemporary Strategic Planning Tools and Applications For Construction Managers." First International Conference on Construction Project Management, Singapore, Jan. 1995. pp. 25-40.

 

ABSTRACT: Strategic planning (SP) has received significant attention by construction executives in recent times, perhaps due to an increasingly competitive marketplace and perhaps because university-trained managers have assumed positions of authority in construction companies.  For whatever reasons, there is a large and, sometimes baffling array of SP tools and applications.  The size of this array makes selection and application difficult.  Business Process Reengineering (BPR), Total Quality Management (TQM) and Continuous Process Improvement (CPI), are three of the more prominent. This paper outlines those different tools and presents the authors' views on which tools are appropriate for specific circumstances particular to the construction industry. One of the main contributions is the set of guidelines which may be employed for choosing these different SP tools and applications. The paper concludes with a discussion of the subject of "Reengineering Therapy", which appears to be a critical and under appreciated criterion for reengineering success.


PROFESSIONAL MAGAZINES


9. Kwak, Y.H. (2010) “Meeting with Global Project Management Expert: PM is Blue Ocean (글로벌 프로 젝트경영 전문 가와 만남: ‘PM 블루 오션이다!’”, Korean Project Management Association, Summer 2010, 78-82. (in Korean).

 

8. Kwak, Y.H. (2010) “Comparando Gerenciamento de Projectos e Seis Sigma (in Portuguese)” Revisita Mundo Project Management, Dec/Jan 2010, 8-13.

 

7. Ibbs, C. W. and Kwak, Y.H., (2005) “Calculating Project Management’s Return on Investment,” Projects and Profits, ICFAI University Press, March, pp. 19-33.  Reprint of Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (2000). “Calculating Project Management's Return on Investment", Project Management Journal, 31(2), pp. 38-47.

 

6. Kwak, Y.H. (1999) “University Tour: The George Washington University, Washington, DC” PROMAT (Project Management & Technology), Winter, 50-53. (in Korean).

 

5. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (1999) “Analyzing PM Maturity vs. Project Performance: Deriving PM/Return on Investment (ROI)”, PROMAT (Project Management & Technology), Winter, 12-15. (in Korean).

 

4. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (1999) “PM Maturity Benchmarking Model and its Results” PROMAT (Project Management & Technology), Fall, 12-16. (in Korean).

 

3. Kwak, Y.H., Ibbs, C.W. and Kim, Y.W. (1999) “A System Approach to Evaluate Quantitative Impacts of Project Management I” PROMAT (Project Management & Technology), Summer, 12-18. (in Korean).

 

2. Ibbs, C.W. and Kwak, Y.H. (1998), "Benchmarking Project Management Organizations." PMNetwork, Feb. 1998, 49-53.

 

SUMMARY: This paper summarizes research sponsored by the Project Management Institute (PMI) Educational Foundation and PMI's Northern California Chapter, and conducted by a team from the University of California at Berkeley. It examines current PM levels and practices in various companies and industries.  It does this by developing a tool that could be used in for an indefinite period of time for ongoing benchmarking. This benchmarking system quantitatively examines and benchmarks current PM processes and practices of 38 different companies and government agencies in 4 different industries. The overall PM Maturity for all companies is 3.26 on a relative Likert Scale of 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest). All industries have substantial opportunity to improve. In addition, the average organization in this study spends 6% of its annual project-based sales or revenues on total project management expenditures.

 

1. Ibbs, C.W. and Kwak, Y.H. (1998), "Measuring Project Management's Return on Investment." PMNetwork, Nov. 1997, 36-38.

 

SUMMARY: This paper summarizes research sponsored by the Project Management Institute (PMI) Educational Foundation and PMI's Northern California Chapter, and conducted by a team from the University of California at Berkeley. The goal of this research is to measure the Return on Investment for Project Management (PM/ROI). Using a Schedule Index and a Cost Index (which measure actual performance relative to planned performance) we show that a positive correlation exists between organizations with higher PM maturities and favorable cost and schedule project performance. These data are used as a basis to develop curves that show predicted cost and schedule performance levels for a specific PM Maturity level. These curves can then be used by the individual organization to estimate what project performance gains might reasonably be expected if the organization takes steps to improve its PM Maturity.  That information, in turn, can be used to estimate its specific PM/ROI.


CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS


46. Kwak, Y.H., Patanakul, P, Liu, M., and Zwikael, O. (2014) “Lessons Learned from Investigating Large Government Projects and Programs” 2014 PMI Research and Education Conference, Portland, Oregon, July 27-29, 2014.

 

45. Sadatsafavai, H., Walewski, J., Williams, N.L., and Kwak, Y.H. (2014) “Evolution of Project Based Organization: A Case Study” 4th Conference of the International Network of Business and Management, Barcelona, Spain, June 25-27, 2014.

 

44. Ghosh, S., Amaya, L., and Kwak, Y.H. (2014) “Knowledge Governance Model for Successful Projects” 23rd International Management of Technology Annual Conference, Washington, DC, May 22-26, 2014.

 

43. Park, C. and Kwak, Y.H. (2014) “Project Ecosystem Competency Model” 23rd International Management of Technology Annual Conference, Washington, DC, May 22-26, 2014.

 

42. Choi, K., Ryoo, B.Y., and Kwak, Y.H. (2013). “Cluster-Driven Life-Cycle Cost Analysis Model for Transportation Infrastructure Improvement Projects.” UKC 2013, East Rutherford, NJ, August 7-11.

 

41. Gosh S., Kwak Y.H., and Cheerla A. (2013) “Dimensions and Codes of Good Project Governance” 11th International Research Network on Organizing by Projects (IRNOP) conference, Oslo, Norway, June 17-19, 2013.

 

40. Ahn, Y.H. Kwak, Y.H. and, Suk, S.J. (2013) “Organizational Transformation Strategies for Adopting Building Information Modeling in the Engineering-Construction Industry” The 5th International Conference on Construction Engineering and Project Management, Anaheim, CA, Jan 9-11, 2013.

 

39. Suh, M.J. Pearce, A.R., and Kwak, Y.H. (2013) “The Effect of LEED Certified Building on The Surrounding Neighborhood in New York CityThe 5th International Conference on Construction Engineering and Project Management, Anaheim, CA, Jan 9-11, 2013.

 

38. Kwak, Y.H. (2012) “Lessons Learned from the History of Hoover Dam Project” US-Korea Conference on Science, Technology, and Entrepreneurship (UKC 2012), Los Angeles, CA, Aug 8-11, 2012.

 

37. Kwak, Y.H., Liu, M., Patanakul, P., and Zwikael, O. (2012) “Strategic Management of High-Risk Government Mega Projects and Programs” PMI Research and Education Conference, Limerick, Ireland, July 15-18, 2012.

 

36. Park, J., Kwak, Y.H., Ahn, C., Lee, S., and Pena-Mora, F. (2012) “Delivering Infrastructure Projects through the Lens of Sustainability” Production and Operation Management Society Annual Conference, Chicago, April 20-23, 2012.

 

35. Kwak, Y.H. and Lee. G. (2012) “Harnessing Social Media for Increased Public Engagement” NASA Project Management Challenge 2012, Orlando, FL, February 22-23, 2012.

 

34. Lee, G. and Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “A Maturity Model for Technology-Enabled Open Government”, Pre-ICIS eGovernment Workshop, Shanghai, China, December 4, 2011.

 

33. Ghosh, S., Boswell, J., Kwak, Y.H., and Skibniewski, M. (2011) “Risk Governance Framework for Enterprise Wide Application Implementations”, IEEE International Technology Management Conference (ITMC)-2011, San Jose, CA, June 27-30.

 

32. Ghosh, S., Negahban, S., Kwak, Y.H., and Skibniewski, M. (2011) “ Impact of Sustainability on Integration and Interoperability between BIM and ERP- A Governance Framework”, IEEE International Technology Management Conference (ITMC)-2011, San Jose, CA, June 27-30.

 

31. Lee, G. and Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “Open Government Implementation Model: A Stage Model for Achieving Increased Public Engagement12th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research (dg.o 2011): Digital Government Innovation in Challenging Times, College Park MD, June 12–15 2011.

 

30. Young, L., Valerdi, R., Farr, J., and Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “An Approach to Estimate the Life Cycle Cost and Effort of Project Management for Systems Centric Projects”, 2011 International Society of Parametric Analysts (ISPA) and the Society of Cost Estimating and Analysis (SCEA) Conference, Albuquerque, NM, June 7-10, 2011.

 

29. Choi, K., Lee, E.B., Kwak, Y.H., and Pyeon, J.H. (2011). “Optimal Incentive/Disincentive Predictive Model for Transportation Projects” 2nd International Conference on Transportation Construction Management, Federal Highway Administration, Orlando, FL, Feb. 7-10, 2011.

 

28. Choi, K. Kwak, Y.H., and Yu, B. (2010) “Quantitative Model for Determining Incentive/Disincentive Amounts through Schedule Simulations”, 2010 Winter Simulation Conference, Baltimore, MD, Dec. 5-8, 2010.

 

27. Kwak, Y.H., Cioffi, D.F., and Khamooshi, H. (2010) “Revamping a Curriculum: GWU's Modern Comprehensive M.S. in Project Management (in Two Delivery Systems), 2010 Annual Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) meeting, Austin, TX, Nov. 7-10, 2010.

 

26. Kwak, Y.H., Choi, K., and Park, J. (2010) “Impacts of Change Orders on Project Performance”, 2010 Annual Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) meeting, Austin, TX, Nov. 7-10, 2010.

 

25. Young, L., Farr, J., Valerdi, R., and Kwak, Y.H. (2010) “A Framework for Evaluating Life Cycle Project Management Costs on Systems Centric Projects”, American Society for Engineering Management 2010, 31st Annual Conference, Rogers, AR., October 13-16, 2010.

 

24. Kwak, Y.H. (2010) “Project Portfolio Management (PPM) - Strategic and Operational Agility through Projects” Project Management Institute Research Conference, Washington, DC, July 11-14, 2010.

 

23. Kwak, Y.H. (2009) “Public-Private-Partnership in Infrastructure Development” Professional Development Workshop, 2009 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Chicago, Aug 7-11, 2009.

 

22. Anbari F.T. and Kwak, Y.H. (2009) “Trends of Project Management Research” 2009 Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Chicago, Aug 7-11, 2009.

 

21. Anbari, F.T. and Kwak, Y.H. (2008) “Is there a Future for Project Management in the Allied Management Disciplines?” 22nd International Project Management Association World Congress, Rome, Italy, Nov 9-11, 2008.

 

20. Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (2008) “Project Management Research Trends of Allied Disciplines” 2008 PMI Research Conference, Warsaw, Poland, July 13-16, 2008.

 

19. Kwak, Y.H., Wetter, J., and Anbari, F.T. (2006)Business Process Best Practices: Project Management or Six Sigma?” 2006 PMI Research Conference, Montreal, Canada, July 16-19, 2006.

 

18. Anbari, F.T. and Kwak, Y.H. (2005) “Six Sigma Programs and Proactive Risk Management” Project Management Challenge 2005, Second Annual NASA Project Management Conference, College Park, MD, March 22-23, 2005.

 

17. Watson, R. and Kwak, Y.H. (2005) “Conceptual Estimating of Deployment Costs for Technology-Driven Projects” Project Estimation Conference (Internal), IBM Academy of Technology, Boulder, Co, Jan 24-26, 2005.

 

16. Watson, R. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Development of a Parametric Estimating Model for Technology-Driven Deployment Project." 2004 Winter Simulation Conference, Washington, DC, December 5-8, 2004.

 

15. Chang, H. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Lessons Learned from Spatial Database Infrastructure Projects in Developing Countries." Sixth World Congress on Computational Mechanics, Information Technology for Management of Infrastructure Mini-Symposium, Beijing, China, September 5-10, 2004.

 

14. Chang, H. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Urban Spatial Database Infrastructure: Issues in Developing Countries." ASEM 04'(Advances in Structural Engineering and Mechanics), Infrastructure and Information Technology Session, Seoul, Korea, September 2-4, 2004.

 

13. Anbari, F.T. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Success Factors in Managing Six Sigma Projects." 2004 Project Management Institute Research Conference, London, UK, July 11-14, 2004.

 

12. Watson, R. and Kwak, Y.H. (2004) "Parametric Estimating in the Knowledge Age: Capitalizing on Technological Advances." IAMOT 2004 13th International Conference on Management of Technology, Washington, DC, April 3-7, 2004.

 

11. Kwak, Y.H. (2003) "Perceptions and Practices of Project Risk Management: Aggregating 300 Project Manager Years." 2003 PMI Global Congress, Baltimore, MD, Sept 21-23, 2003.

 

10. Kwak, Y.H. (2002) "Critical Success Factors in International Development Project Management." CIB 10th International Symposium Construction Innovation & Global Competitiveness, Cincinnati, Ohio, Sept. 9-13, 2002.

 

9. Kwak, Y.H. and Dewan, S. (2001). "Risk Management in International Development Projects." 2001 Project Management Institute Annual Seminars and Symposiums, Nashville, TN, Nov. 4-7, 2001.

 

8. Kwak, Y.H. (2001) "Examining the History of Project Office." Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) Annual Meeting 2001, Miami Beach, FL, Nov. 4-7, 2001.

 

7. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W (2000). "The Berkeley Project Management Process Maturity Model: Measuring the Value of Project Management." 2000 IEEE EMS International Engineering Management Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico, Aug. 13-15, 2000, pp. 1-5.

 

6. Kwak, Y.H. and Dai, C (2000). "Assessing the Value of Project Management Offices (PMO)." Project Management Institute Research Conference 2000, PMI, Paris, France, Jun 21-24, 2000, pp. 333-338.

 

5. Kwak, Y.H. and Bushey, R. (2000), "Construction Management at Risk: An Innovative Project Delivery Method at Stormwater Treatment Area in the Everglades, Florida" Proceedings of ASCE Construction Congress VI, Orlando, Florida, Feb. 20-22, 2000. pp. 477-482.

 

4. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (1997),"Quantitative Benchmarking of Project Management (PM) Processes." Proceedings of ASCE Construction Congress V, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Oct. 5-9, 1997. pp. 980-987.

 

3. Ibbs, C.W. and Kwak, Y.H. (1997), "Financial and Organizational Impacts of Project Management." Proceedings of the 28th Annual PMI Seminars & Symposium, Chicago, Illinois, Sept. 29- Oct. 1, 1997. pp. 496-500.

 

2. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (1996), "Financial and Organizational impacts of project management." Organization and Management of construction: shaping theory and practice vol. 2; Managing the construction project and managing risk, 8th International Symposium W65 Commission, London; E&FN Spon 1996. pp. 252-263.

 

1. Kwak, Y.H., Clark, A., Grilo, A., Betts, M., Ibbs, C.W. (1995), "Contemporary Strategic Planning Tools and Applications For Construction Managers." First International Conference on Construction Project Management, Singapore, Jan. 1995. pp. 25-40.


KEYNOTE SPEAKER and OTHER PRESENTATIONS


18. Kwak, Y.H. (2013) “Strategies for Sustainable Infrastructure Development, Management, and Evaluation” First International Workshop of Green Infrastructure Technology for Climate Change, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea, May 30, 2013.

 

17. Kwak, Y.H. (2013) “Strategies for Sustainable Infrastructure Development” Construction Economics Research Institute of Korea (CERIK), May 28, 2013.

 

16. Kwak, Y.H. (2013) “Project Financing and Sustainable Construction Project Management” Seoul National University Engineering Project Management Program, May 23, 2013.

 

15. Kwak, Y.H. (2012) “Engineering-Infrastructure Project Management Strategy” POSTECH, Pohang, May 31, 2012.

 

14. Kwak, Y.H. (2012) “Engineering-Infrastructure Project Management Strategy” KAIST, Daejon, May 29, 2012.

 

13. Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “Global Project Financing Trends and Strategies” Construction Economics Research Institute of Korea (CERIK), May 31, 2011.

 

12. Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “Applications and Trends of Earned Value Management Practice in US Government” Korean Project Management Association (KPMA), May 30, 2011.

 

11. Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “New Trends and Strategies of Project Management Practice: Project Financing, Earned Value Management, and Business Analytics” Yonsei University, May 27, 2011.

 

10. Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “Trends and Future of Project Management Research, Education, and Practice” Korean Project Management Forum, May 26, 2011.

 

9. Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “Strategies and Momentum of Global Project Management Market” HanmiGlobal, May 24, 2011.

 

8. Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “Project Financing and US PPP Transportation Projects” Seoul National University Engineering Project Management Program, May 20, 2011.

 

7. Kwak, Y.H. (2011) “New Trends and Future of Project Management: Maturity Model, Mega-Projects, and Future of PM” Seoul National University Engineering Project Management Program, Jan 28, 2011.

 

6. Kwak, Y.H. (2010) “Project Management and its Allied Disciplines: Past, Present, and Future”, Yonsei University (5/28/2010) and Seoul National University (6/1/2010), Seoul, Korea.

 

5. Kwak, Y.H. (2010) “The Future of Construction Management and Project Management”, Yonsei University Civil Engineering 50th Anniversary Symposium, May 27, 2009, Seoul, Korea. Keynote Speech.

 

4. Kwak, Y.H. (2009) “Project Management Maturity Model: Measuring PM Maturity” Department of Civil Engineering, University of Maryland, Nov 12, 2009.

 

3. Kwak, Y.H. (2009) “Project Management and its Allied Disciplines”, Master of Project Management Program, Project Management Community of Practice Conference, Penn State, Erie, Aug. 18, 2009. Keynote Speech.

 

2. Kwak, Y.H. and Anbari, F.T. (2008) "Is there a Future for Project Management in the Allied Management Disciplines?” George Washington University School of Business, Oct 24, 2008. Departmental Seminar.

 

1. Kwak, Y.H. (2002) Strategy to Implement Project Management Office: Challenges, Benefits, and Practices.  Mastering the Project Management Office: An Asian Perspective, Mastering the Project Management Office: An Asian Perspective, ESI International, Singapore, May 29-30, 2002. (Unable to attend)


MAGAZINE/NEWSPAPER ARTICLES and MEDIA APPERANCE


9. Featured in the article “Earned Value Management: Insights from NASA”, PMI Community Post, Mar 12, 2012.

 

8. Featured in the article “An Overlooked Value Driver”, CFA Magazine, Nov/Dec 2011, p.31-33.

 

7. Featured in the article “Government 2.0: An Implementation Model,” Kogod Now, Fall 2011, pp. 29-31.

 

6. IBM-sponsored research on Social Media and Open Government has been featured in

- “Big Blue Guide to Implementing Open Government,” GovFresh, March 17, 2001.

- “IT Problems are Hindering Agency Transparency Initiatives,” Fierce Government IT, Feb. 3, 2011.

- “Agencies Face Challenges in Delivering Open Government,” NextGov.com, Feb. 1, 2011.

- “Agencies face problems opening up government,” Federal Computer Week, Jan. 31, 2011.

- Australian Policy Online, Policypointers.org, Openforumeurope.org, Washingtoncog.org, GovLoop.com

 

5. Interview (one hour) regarding Open Government Implementation, Conversation with Authors Series, Federal News Radio (1500 AM) and CBS Radio, Feb. 15, 2011.

 

4. Interview regarding Project Management in Government: An Introduction to Earned Value Management, Federal News Radio (1500 AM) and CBS Radio, Nov. 1, 2010.

 

3. Featured in the article “School of business will record classes”, GW Hatchet, Sep. 18, 2008.

 

2. Featured in the article “New F Street residence hall to cost $75 million”, GW Hatchet, Sep. 2007.

 

1. Featured in the article "Project Management Maturity and ROI" Project Management Institute New York City Chapter Newsletter, April 2002, Vol.4 (4).


INTERNAL TECHNICAL REPORTS


3. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (1998). "Understanding The Berkeley Project Management Process Maturity (PM)2 Model." Technical Report No. 98-06, Construction Engineering and Management Program, University of California at Berkeley, June.

 

2.Ibbs, C.W. and Kwak, Y.H. (1998) "US Yokosuka Naval Complex Traffic and Parking Study." Final Report, Department of the Navy, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Contract No. 62836-97-Q-1135, Feb.

 

1. Kwak, Y.H. and Ibbs, C.W. (1997). "A Systematic Approach to Evaluate Quantitative Impacts of Project Management (PM)." Technical Report No. 97-04, Construction Engineering and Management Program, Department of Civil Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, May.


DISSERTATION


Kwak, Young Hoon, A Systematic Approach to Evaluate Quantitative Impacts of Project Management, Ph.D. Dissertation, Department of Civil Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, May 1997, 149 pages. Dissertation Abstracts available.


GRANTS WRITING

Grant and Proposal Writing Guide from National Science Foundation.

 

ADVICE ON RESEARCH AND WRITING

Collection of advice about how to do research and how to communicate effectively.


Last Updated: August 30, 2014. YHK.